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download

1. a file transferred onto a computer from another computer or the internet
2. a file obtained in this way
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

download

[′dau̇n ‚lōd]
(computer science)
To transfer a program or data file from a central computer to a remote computer or to the memory of an intelligent terminal.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

download

i. To reduce the angle of attack of an aircraft.
ii. Any load acting downward on an aircraft.
iii. To acquire data from an external source.
An Illustrated Dictionary of Aviation Copyright © 2005 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved

download

(jargon)
To transfer data from one computer to another. Downloading usually refers to transfer from a larger "host" system (especially a server or mainframe) to a smaller "client" system, especially a microcomputer or specialised peripheral, and "upload" usually means from small to large.

Others hold that, technically, download means "receive" and upload means "send", irrespective of the size of the systems involved.

Note that in communications between ground and space, space-to-earth transmission is always "down" and the reverse "up", regardless of size. So far the in-space machines have invariably been smaller; thus the upload/download distinction has been reversed from its usual sense.
This article is provided by FOLDOC - Free Online Dictionary of Computing (foldoc.org)

download

To transmit a file over a network. In a communications session, "download" and "upload" imply a remote/local scenario, in which data are being downloaded from the "remote" server into the user's "local" computer. Uploading is the reverse.

The time it takes to download depends on file size and network speed. Via analog dial-up modems, Web pages take several seconds, and a 10MB file can take an hour. DSL, cable and FiOS are from 15 to 600 times faster, reaching the same speed as downloading from a server within the local network (LAN). See Internet speed.

From the Internet
Downloading images, articles and applications from the Internet is no more than "Click Here" on a Web page. The only thing users must know is what to do with the downloaded file. If the download is an app, it must be installed, which can happen automatically or require the user to take one more step. See download vs. upload, download protocol and client download.

From the Local Network (LAN)
In a server in a private network, files are placed in sharable folders that can be downloaded to users' computers. Using a file manager, such as Explorer in Windows or Finder in Mac, users can locate the files by computer and folder name. See file manager.

From Computer to Mobile Devices
Transferring files to a smartphone or tablet plugged into the USB port of a computer is more a copy function than a download. The mobile device appears as a storage drive to the computer.


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