DEMS


Also found in: Acronyms, Idioms.

DEMS

References in classic literature ?
I jolt dem right out in deh street before dey knows where dey is!
Dat's what I says teh dem: 'Don' come in here an' make no trouble,' I says, like dat.
Now, Mas'r George, you jest take off dem books, and set down now with my old man, and I'll take up de sausages, and have de first griddle full of cakes on your plates in less dan no time."
"Dem Lincons an't much count, no way!" said Aunt Chloe, contemptuously; "I mean, set along side our folks.
'em putt'n dey han's up 'fo' dey eyes en sayin' to David and Goliah en dem yuther prophets, 'Dat chile is dress' to indelicate fo' dis place.'"
Blame dat man, he worries me wid dem ornery glasses o' his'n; I b'lieve he's a witch.
He was not a beast; he was a man, and he talked to Bertran, und Bertran comprehended, for I bave seen dem. Und he was always politeful to me except when I talk too long to Bertran und say nodings at all to him.
Agreeable to these observations was, I remember, the complaint of the great Doctor Misaubin, who used very pathetically to lament the late applications which were made to his skill, saying, "Bygar, me believe my pation take me for de undertaker, for dey never send for me till de physicion have kill dem."
Very well--then THE rain is DER Regen, if it is simply in the quiescent state of being MENTIONED, without enlargement or discussion--Nominative case; but if this rain is lying around, in a kind of a general way on the ground, it is then definitely located, it is DOING SOMETHING--that is, RESTING (which is one of the German grammar's ideas of doing something), and this throws the rain into the Dative case, and makes it DEM Regen.
Die Aussicht auf dem K:onigsstuhl mehr gr:osser ist, aber geistlische sprechend nicht so scho"n, lob' Gott!
I hain't hearn 'bout none un um, skasely, but ole King Soller- mun, onless you counts dem kings dat's in a pack er k'yards.
'You are the demdest, knowing hand,' replied Mr Mantalini, in an admiring tone, 'the cunningest, rummest, superlativest old fox--oh dem!--to pretend now not to know that it was the little bright-eyed niece--the softest, sweetest, prettiest--'