Dirk

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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Dirk

 

a silent weapon used for thrusting, a thin straight dagger with a ground blade and a short handle. A part of the dress uniform in the navies of various states.

In the Soviet Navy the dirk is worn with full dress, ceremonial and semidress, and parade service uniforms of admirals, generals, officers, and warrant officers (michmany and praporshchiki). In the Soviet Army the dirk is worn by generals, officers, and warrant officers (praporshchiki) in accordance with special directives for ceremonial parades in Moscow, Leningrad, and other hero-cities and capitals of the Union republics.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Dr Dirks, however, dismisses the notion that the majority of global conflict could be traced back to religious differences, suggesting that more often than not people would use religion to mask their true intentions.
The first in Dr Dirks' series of lectures was a talk delivered at the Royal University for Women on Islamic Trajectories in early Christianity.
Dr Dirks also held public lectures at the Beit Al Quran on Jesus to Mohammed - early Christianity and Islam and Muslims in American History - A forgotten legacy, which is being held today, at Beit Al Quran, from 8pm.
In fact, DIRKS has its origins in business systems analysis methodologies that for years have been used in the information management disciplines.
This methodology for managing business information consists of eight principal steps, as outlined in the DIRKS Manual summary.
Before beginning the DIRKS implementation, companies should:
* Prepare a business case to address the needs of the DIRKS program as well as the expected costs and benefits.
Describe the DIRKS process and establish what assistance and support is required from managers and staff.
The Supreme Court's message to the SEC in Dirks was as clear as it was in Chiarella: If you want a level playing field, go see Congress, not us.
As with Chiarella, Dirks, and Winans, no one in the market was hurt by this action, not even O'Hagan's client.
Its prosecution of Ray Dirks for saving his clients from the Equity Funding fraud and its failure to sue Sam Waksal's daughter, father, and anonymous friends for their insider trading suggest why.