genetic fingerprinting

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genetic fingerprinting

[jə¦ned·ik ′fiŋ·gər‚print·iŋ]
(forensic science)
A forensic identification technique that enables virtually 100% discrimination between individuals from small samples of blood or semen, using probes for hypervariable minisatellite deoxyribonucleic acid. Also known as DNA fingerprinting.
(cell and molecular biology)
Identification of chemical entities in animal tissues as indicative of the presence of specific genes.
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What is the global (North America, South America, Europe, Africa, Middle East, Asia, China, Japan) production, production value, consumption, consumption value, import and export of DNA Analysis in Government?
'It is particularly of great interest that this year's theme will discuss DNA analysis and its applications in solving the challenges of parentage.
Giving an alternative view, CAMB director Dr Nadeem Sheikh pointed out that incorporation of DNA analysis into crime investigation and paternity testing had proved to be of incredible importance in forensics.
The second half of the book describes applications of gene cloning and DNA analysis in research, medicine, agriculture, forensic science, and archaeology.
Bode is already carrying on DNA analysis for 240 cases that were sent to them in mid September and the effort is for the first results to come out next month.
The book begins with an investigator's commentary on forensic DNA evidence collection, then encompasses all aspects of forensic DNA analysis, from sample collection at the crime scene to emerging technologies.
The P-DNA Analyzer is designed to be user-friendly, enabling DNA analysis to be carried out by non-scientific specialists without pipette analysis.
But the inventor of the system which linked Colin Duffy and Brian Shivers to the vehicle insisted it provided more accurate results than traditional DNA analysis.
"Nuclear DNA analysis has been subjected to more scrutiny than any other forensic discipline, with extensive experimentation and validation performed prior to its use in investigations," the report said.
Under the agreements, Cellmark will conduct DNA analysis of crime scene samples for submission to the National DNA Database.
For instance, DNA analysis suggested that when much of North America was covered with glaciers, Echinacea found southern refuges on both sides of the Mississippi River.
Now researchers at Lund University in Sweden, working together with the Swedish National Laboratory of Forensic Science, SKL, have improved a critical part of the analysis process.The first findings, published in the latest issue of the journal Biotechniques, indicate that the new method strengthens the DNA analysis so that previously negative samples yield positive and usable DNA profiles."The results are overwhelming.