genetic fingerprinting

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genetic fingerprinting

[jə¦ned·ik ′fiŋ·gər‚print·iŋ]
(forensic science)
A forensic identification technique that enables virtually 100% discrimination between individuals from small samples of blood or semen, using probes for hypervariable minisatellite deoxyribonucleic acid. Also known as DNA fingerprinting.
(cell and molecular biology)
Identification of chemical entities in animal tissues as indicative of the presence of specific genes.
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tuberculosis culture with no AFB seen in any specimen; 3) culture-positive specimen from a different patient processed or handled on the same day has an identical DNA fingerprint, and no epidemiologic connections exist between patients; 4) laboratory control strain has an identical fingerprint; and 5) time to growth detection is [greater than]30 days.
Thus, the DNA fingerprint from an innocent suspect could match that of the real criminal.
Lynch 1990, 1991) between DNA fingerprints was calculated as the number of bands shared between each pair of individuals (|n.
tuberculosis Strains on the Basis of DNA Fingerprint Patterns by Using the IS6110 Method in Specific Geographic Areas.
To settle this controversy, the panel -- which was convened by the National Academy of Sciences -- endorses a so-called "ceiling principle" for interpreting DNA fingerprints.
All the pelts' DNA fingerprints matched those of either gray wolves or coyotes.
Similar DNA fingerprints exist when two or more patients' isolates share an IS6110-DNA fingerprint that differs by a single band (i.
Gill, Jeffreys and Werrett produced DNA fingerprints from samples that might be available to a detective: 4-year-old bloodstains and semen stains on cloth.
The possibility exists that clusters that occurred over several years were strains that lingered in the community but were not detected in our study; we obtained DNA fingerprints for only 55% of the cases in the community among nonhomeless persons and cannot rule out that possibility.
By October 1998, test results on Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from the four men demonstrated a matching 11-band DNA fingerprint pattern [2], suggesting that these case-patients were epidemiologically linked.