ICF

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ICF

(Internet Connection Firewall) The built-in firewall in Windows XP. It provides a stateful inspection of packets which accepts only responses to requests originated by the user. This will prevent outside requests for data from entering the computer, unless specifically allowed by the user. However, spyware programs are often clandestinely installed in a user's computer which then make seemingly legitimate requests that a stateful firewall will allow responses to.

To turn on ICF, go to the Network Connections control panel and right click the connection (on the right side) that you want to protect. Select Properties, then the Advanced tab and check "Protect my computer..."

In the 2004 release of Service Pack 2 for Windows XP, Microsoft enhanced ICF and renamed it Windows Firewall. Unlike ICF, Windows Firewall is turned on by default. See firewall. See also IFC.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The methylation of de novo (new) genomic sequence is carried out by both DNMT3A and DNMT3B (see Figure 1) [29, 33].
Since mtDNA becomes hypomethylated during senescence, we examined the role of three DNA methyltransferases (DNMT1, DNMT3A, and DNMT3B) that control DNA methylation.
We estimated the associations between variants in eight genes: DNMT1, DNMT3A, DNMT3B, DNMT3L, TET1, TET2, TET3, and TDG, and LINE1 and AluYb8 methylation using linear regression models described above.
We measured mRNA levels Svs4, Ltf, Pgr (progesterone receptor), Stat3, Stat5a, DNMT1, DNMT3A, DNMT3B, MeCP2, MBD2, MBD3, HDAC1, and HDAC2 using SYBR green assays (Applied Biosystems, Foster City, CA).
There is also evidence that other methyltransferases, such as DNA-methyltransferases (DNMT1a, DNMT3b), are capable of arsenic methylation (Engstrom et al.
Studies in cell lines and mouse models exposed to arsenic for [less than or equal to] 22 and 48 weeks, respectively, have shown that prolonged exposure to sodium arsenite resulted in decreased global DNA methylation, and inhibition of DNA (cytosine-5-)-methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1), DNMT3A, and DNA (cytosine-5-)-methyltransferase 3 beta (DNMT3B) gene expression (Reichard and Puga 2010; Ren et al.
Genotyping (n = 172) for the DNA (cytosine5-)-methyltransferase 1 gene (DNMT1 rs10854076 and rs2228611) and DNA (cytosine-5-)-methyltransferase 3 beta gene (DNMT3B rs2424913 and rs2424932) was performed with Sequenom iPLEX GOLD SNP genotyping; and gene expression (n = 90), with DirectHyb HumanHT-12 (version 3.0).
The methyltransferase genes were arsenic(+III oxidation state) methyltransferase (AS3MT), DNA-methyltransferase la and 3b (DNMT la and DNMT3b), phosphatidyl ethanolamine N-methyltransferase (PEMT), and betaine-homocysteine methyltransferase (BHMT).
The methyltransferase genes were arsenic(+III oxidation state) methyltransferase (AS3MT), DNA-methyltransferase la and 3b (DNMT1a and DNMT3b, respectively), phosphatidylethanolamine N-methyltransferase (PEMT), and betaine-homocysteine methyltransferase (BHMT).
In addition to its effect on SAM availability, arsenic can directly interact with DNMTs and inhibit their activities, Several studies have shown that arsenic exposure leads to a dose-dependent reduction of mRNA levels and activity of DNMTs both in vitro and in vivo, including DNMT1, DNMT3A, and DNMT3B (Ahlborn et al.
Genomic profiling of DNA methyltransferases reveals a role for DNMT3B in genic methylation.