DNS


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DNS

(fluid mechanics)
(computer science)

DNS

(1)

DNS

(2)
Distributed Name Service. See DECdns.

DNS

(Domain Name System) The Internet's system for converting alphabetic names into numeric IP addresses. For example, when a Web address (URL) is typed into a browser, DNS servers return the IP address of the Web server associated with that name. In this made-up example, the DNS converts the URL www.company.com into the IP address 204.0.8.51. Without DNS, you would have to type the series of four numbers and dots into your browser to retrieve the website, which you actually can do. See IP address.

A Hierarchy of Servers
The DNS system is a hierarchy of duplicated database servers worldwide that begin with the "root servers" for the top-level domains (.com, .net, .org, etc.). The root servers point to the "authoritative" servers located in ISPs, as well as in large companies, that turn the names into IP addresses; the process known as "name resolution." Using our www.company.com example, COMPANY.COM is the domain name, and WWW is the hostname. The domain name is the organization's identity on the Web, and the hostname is the name of the Web server within that domain (see WWW). See DNS records, zone file, reverse DNS, recursive DNS, DDNS, HOSTS file, mDNS, ping, root server and WINS.


Getting a Web Page
Converting the domain name (URL) in a Web browser into an IP address takes numerous queries. Along the way, there can be more name servers than are shown here.







Caching Speeds Up Delivery
If the ABC.COM Web address was previously requested by one of the ISP's customers, its IP address is cached (stored) in the DNS server and returns the IP address immediately. A user's computer also typically caches IP addresses, which can eliminate the DNS query all together if the address is already in the cache.
References in periodicals archive ?
Secure64 DNS Authority is a DNS authoritative server that provides the highest levels of security, availability and resiliency under attack without the cost and complexity of conventional solutions.
DNSSEC or DNS Security Extensions provides a level of additional security where the web browser can check to make sure the DNS information is correct and was not modified.
"Enterprises today fall prey to DNS threats due to their increasing sophistication and frequency.
Such dynamic change requires a DNS platform that supports high API call rates and fast change propagation, neither of which can be facilitated by traditional DNS systems.
"A vast proportion of security incidents occur via email or the web, and DNS requests make up a large portion of the associated web activity.
Lowyat.net said some website with the .my domain name may still accessible due to cached information in DNS resolvers globally, but said this will only last until the expiry of the caches.
ClouDNS monitoring nodes check the customer's services primary IP address every minute, and the DNS Failover keeps the websites and services online in the event of a system or network outage.
David Williamson, CEO of EfficientIP summarized the research, saying, "Worryingly, the frequency and financial consequences of DNS attacks have risen and businesses are late in implementing purpose-built security solutions to prevent, detect and mitigate attacks.
With above literature support, the present study was conducted to evaluate the rhinomanometrical and clinicoradiological differences in DNS.
In fact, the actual DNS traffic is inherently imbalanced, in which most of the cases are benign and far fewer cases are malicious.
In [4], dynamic load balancing method using dynamic DNS update and round-robin mechanism is proposed.
Nominum(TM), the DNS-based security and services innovation provider, has announced that QTNet, a subsidiary of Kyushu Electric Power company in Fukuoka, Japan, has selected the company's DNS solutions to significantly improve the security and performance of its broadband network, the company said.