DSL modem


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Related to DSL modem: Cable modem

DSL modem

A device used to connect a single computer or a network to a telephone company digital subscriber line (DSL) service for Internet access. DSL is faster than analog dial-up but significantly slower than cable service. Download speeds have reached 10 Mbps and beyond, but the connection is asynchronous. In order to prevent users with low-cost DSL access from hosting high-traffic Web servers, the upload speed is generally much slower than the download speed. Like cable Internet providers, telephone companies may routinely change the user's IP address to prevent Web hosting (see DDNS). See DSL.

Connect Via Ethernet or USB
DSL modems typically connect to the computer or router via Ethernet; however, some DSL modems connect to one computer via USB. In addition, the DSL modem is often combined with the router (see cable/DSL gateway). See DSL and cable/DSL gateway.


DSL Modem and Wireless Router
This Qwest DSL modem includes a wireless router. After installation, users can connect their computers to the Internet via Wi-Fi or an Ethernet cable. See wireless router.
References in periodicals archive ?
The NETGEAR Broadband High-Speed DSL Modem (DM200) is available now from major retailers in stores and online at an MSRP of $59.99 (USD).
Our diverse product portfolio includes solutions for digital cable and satellite set-top boxes; cable and DSL modems and residential gateways; high-speed transmission and switching for local, metropolitan, wide area and storage networking; home and wireless networking; cellular and terrestrial wireless communications; Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP) gateway and telephony systems; broadband network processors; and SystemI/O(TM) server solutions.
Cable or DSL modem -- While wireless networking can be used without an Internet connection, a high-speed cable/DSL connection is recommended for optimum usefulness.
After purchasing an additional 50 feet of Category 5 (Cat 5) cable, Jones connected the computers to the Netgear router and then connected the router to the DSL modem.
Cogent Communications, http://www.cogentco.com, is developing an all fiber-optic system that offers speeds of 100 megabits per second, about 200 times faster than cable and DSL modems and 100 times faster than typical business T1 connections.
The hardware and software that enable devices in a home to share voice, video, and data can reside in a stand-alone unit or be incorporated into DSL modems, cable set-top boxes, PCs, and other devices.
This two-in-one device is a high performance router with an embedded DSL modem supporting ADSL/ADSL2/ADSL2+ and VDSL/VDSL2 speeds.
Typically, base stations are designed to support two to five mobile phones and combine the functionality of a 3G mobile cell site, broadband DSL modem and Wi-Fi hot spot all in one.
It reportedly features firewall; anti-spam; anti-virus; anti-spyware; phishing protection; content filtering controls; integrated DSL modem; wireless gateway; four-port switch; print server; as well as VPN support.
Today's cable or DSL modem not only brings the broadband connection into buildings, it often has the wireless router built right in.
This simple-to-install upgrade to any Ethernet-enabled cable or DSL modem features interactive, on-screen installation instructions, color-coded cables and ports, and an integrated firewall to prevent access by unwanted hackers.
The router enables small businesses to connect multiple PC users who are online simultaneously to share the bandwidth from a single DSL modem. It also allows businesses to perform networking tasks such as file and printer sharing.