DUKW


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Related to DUKW: amphibious vehicle

DUKW

[¦dək ′dəb·əl‚yü]
(ordnance)
A 2½-ton amphibious truck used by the U.S. Army to transport cargo on land or water; 36 feet (11 meters) long, with a cargo capacity of 5175 pounds (2347 kilograms). Also known as duck.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Mr Smitheringale bought the "rusty wrecks" of two DUKWs in late 2017, one with most of the base intact and the other with most of a chassis, and has combined them to create one restored vehicle at his farm near Peterborough.
A line of moored Liberty Ships inside the north-west breakwater -- where there was enough depth for them to float even at low tide -- meanwhile discharged their cargo over the side onto the famous amphibious trucks (DUKWs) which drove on to steel rafts (|Rhino'), then towed ashore.
Mr Clinch said: "As this report is published, I am encouraged that the MCA and DUKW operators are working closely together to devise a framework for safely operating amphibious vehicles in the future."
This was a unique chance to explore the streets of central London onboard an ex-Second World War yellow amphibious DUKW (Duck) vehicle.
The Ducks vehicle is based on the DUKW amphibious trucks used during World War Two and the tour will take you past Independence Hall, the Liberty Bell and the National Constitution Center.
When an amphibious truck or DUKW (pronounced duck) carrying ammunition was hit and exploded, a rain of falling ordnance pelted the beach.
The tours began in April 2001 using the wartime DUKW vehicles called Wacker Quacker I and Wacker Quacker II, taking people around the city centre before splashing into the dock lands water system.
OLD soldiers that once were part of 705 Company RASC (Amphibious), IO Beach Group, who landed on 'Jig Green' sector, Gold Beach, Normandy, manning amphibious DUKW's on D-Day.
The sergeant came in and told me to take my truck over by 10th Army headquarters and haul a load of Jap ammo to a duck [a DUKW amphibious vehicle] to dump into the China Sea.
Marine Accident Investigation Branch (MAIB) chief inspector Steve Clinch said it was "extremely fortunate" that none of the 33 passengers and crew on board the Duck vehicle Wacker Quaker 1, formally known as a DUKW, were drowned or injured when it sank in Salthouse Dock, in Liverpool, on June 15, 2013.
Merseyfully, all the tourists were evacuated before the brightly-painted Second World War DUKW landing craft disappeared beneath the waves.
Around the bend of the river was the site of Richardson DUKW shipyard with its shipways still in use in those days by Head Wrightson who made the large dock gates and cylinders for many of Britain's docks.