DUKW

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DUKW

[¦dək ′dəb·əl‚yü]
(ordnance)
A 2½-ton amphibious truck used by the U.S. Army to transport cargo on land or water; 36 feet (11 meters) long, with a cargo capacity of 5175 pounds (2347 kilograms). Also known as duck.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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Mr Smitheringale bought the "rusty wrecks" of two DUKWs in late 2017, one with most of the base intact and the other with most of a chassis, and has combined them to create one restored vehicle at his farm near Peterborough.
He drove a DUKW amphibious vehicle, designed to travel on both land and water, during the Normandy landings.
The DUKWs landed us at a dirt road leading to the airstrips.
If the tide comes in, youOll cross by World War Two amphibious landing crafts called DUKWs. A break- water extends to the Hermitage Rock I home to JerseyOs patron St Helier.
British Commandos land on the beaches carrying bicycles; Scenes on the beaches during the British advance into France; DUKWs landing on British invasion beaches in northern France
Then there's the Viking Splash Tour, based on reconditioned World War Two amphibious vehicles called DUKWs or, more simply, Ducks.
These craft include the amphibious DUKWs, LARCs and a 60-ton BARC.
A line of moored Liberty Ships inside the north-west breakwater -- where there was enough depth for them to float even at low tide -- meanwhile discharged their cargo over the side onto the famous amphibious trucks (DUKWs) which drove on to steel rafts (|Rhino'), then towed ashore.
WHY The visual representation of the WWII army's complex logistics * WWII DUKWs, trucks, and jeeps * WWII artifacts ranging from cookware to insignia to part of a barracks
MAIB chief inspector Steve Clinch said: "The sinking of two Liverpool DUKWs in quick succession highlighted extremely poor standards of maintenance, and that for nearly 14 years they had operated with insufficient buoyancy foam to keep them afloat should they suffer major damage.
Reference to a number of the 20th FC RCE storm boats being bogged down in the mud, sounds very much like the fate of wheeled amphibious DUKWs, which tried to cross the river with supplies on a previous night.
One of those who returned to the site of the landings was Leonard Smith, now aged 85, who drove amphibious landing craft, DUKWs, known as ducks, ferrying vital supplies to shore to aid Canadian troops at Juno beach.