DVD Forum

(redirected from DVD Consortium)

DVD Forum

A membership organization devoted to defining DVD standards for read-only, rewritable, write-once, video and audio use. Members participate in working groups to develop new standards. Based in Tokyo, Japan and founded in late 1995 as the DVD Consortium, it was renamed the DVD Forum in 1997. "Minus RW" and "Minus R" are commonly used to refer to the DVD-RW and DVD-R formats of the DVD Forum compared to the DVD+RW Alliance's DVD+RW and DVD+R. For more information, visit www.dvdforum.org. See DVD+RW Alliance, DVD Multi and DVD.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Studios control when and where their movies are shown on DVD around the world, thanks to the DVD Consortium and the U.S.
There are at least two blocs in the DVD consortium, one contradicting the other.
Founded in 1995 under the original name DVD Consortium, today's membership includes more than 200 companies.
"Luskin has been a strategic and major player in digital media," said Emiel Petrone, director of the motion picture industry DVD consortium and executive vice president of Philips Entertainment Group.
But the DVD Consortium (now DVD Forum), which originally represented 10 companies involved in DVD hardware manufacturing (Toshiba, Hitachi, Matsushita, Mitsubishi, Pioneer Philips, Sony, Thomson, and JVC) and DVD content provision (Time Warner), agreed upon the name "DVD-RAM."
ZiVA is the industry's first single-chip DVD decoder to incorporate the DVD Consortium's copy protection scheme, known as the content scramble system (CSS).
Toshiba will release the kits even if lingering issues of copy-protection remain unresolved--although the company said the DVD consortium is close to an agreement and only formalities remain.
It wasn't until December 1995 that the Forum (initially known as the DVD Consortium) was formed.
Last month I predicted that the information industry will not wait to start publishing Digital Versatile Disc (DVD) titles until all the hardware manufacturers, members of the DVD Consortium, and the various interest groups agree on a standard implementation of the conditions set by the audio and movie industry.
Philips and Sony, however, "will continue to support" the DVD consortium and the agreed-upon format.