Dactyls


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Dactyls

fabulous smiths; discovered iron and how to work with it. [Gk. Myth.: Leach, 273]
References in periodicals archive ?
P1 chelae dimorphic, with almost completely tuberculated palms, but lacking spines or large tubercules; ventrolateral borders tuberculated to slightly subtoothed; carpus lacking large tubercules medially or ventrally, when upper surface held in a horizontal plane, dactyl moving obliquely in V.
As if to underscore the rift of this loss, the smooth melody of regular dactyls is replaced with a jarring composite of spondees, trochees, iambs, and dactyls, all of which break from the hymns and folk songs that Hardy drew upon.
They captured the hydrozoans using dactyls at the tip of their pereiopods immediately after contact with the jellyfish, a predatory behavior very similar to that seen with the scyphozoans.
Indeed, the traditional triad of Dactyls could be completed by the reference in the next line to the "Sicilian anvil" (Siculaque incude, 278): the third Dactyl brother was often named Acmon or "Anvil.
4) In classical Greek and Latin, dactyls, anapaests, iambs and so on were patterns of long and short syllables.
Hungarian iambic is syllabo-accentual, whereas Hungarian trochees and dactyls are basically "quantitative," as in Greek and Latin poetry.
Members of the Scapteriscinae have two dactyls and include the genera Scapteriscus and Indioscaptor, the latter separated from Scapteriscus in a recent revision (Nickle 2003).
They'd fall into pensive free verse, pick themselves up with a cheerful trio of dactyls, stop again, breathe, grin, or sigh.
Joyce's Ulysses was the self-same "Stately plump Buck Mulligan" of the tripping dactyls, seen strolling about our garden familiarly addressing my mother as "Lily.
Thus, he proves as comfortable discussing iambs, dactyls, spondees, trochees and anapests as he is exploring actor's intentions.
The book bounces along with vigorous and joyous language, much like the rhythmic poetic downhill step he beautifully describes: "Walking has a prosody: when I walk downhill, the legs do dactyls (for the unschooled: one long stride, two doorstop jambs, a stressed syllable and two unstressed: 'dithering,' 'wearying'--'Corsica').
Italian words, however, exhibit a harmony that does not need the symmetry of dactyls and spondees, and grammatical construction in Italian is suited perfectly for the imitation of Greek inversions.