Dada


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Related to Dada: surrealism, dadaism

Dada

Dada (däˈdä) or Dadaism (däˈdäĭzəm), international nihilistic movement among European artists and writers that lasted from 1916 to 1922. Born of the widespread disillusionment engendered by World War I, it originated in Zürich with a 1916 party at the Cabaret Voltaire and the recitation of nonsense poetry by the Romanian Tristan Tzara, also the author of the Dada Manifesto. Dada attacked conventional standards of aesthetics and behavior and stressed absurdity and the role of the unpredictable in artistic creation. In Berlin, Dada had political overtones, exemplified by the caricatures of George Grosz and Otto Dix. The French movement was more literary in emphasis; it centered around Tzara, André Breton, Louis Aragon, Jean Arp, Marcel Duchamp, Francis Picabia, and Man Ray. The latter three carried the spirit of Dada to New York City. Typical were the elegant collages devised by Arp, Kurt Schwitters, and Max Ernst from refuse and scraps of paper, and Duchamp's celebrated Mona Lisa adorned with a mustache and a goatee as well as his Fountain (1917), a urinal signed “R. Mutt.” Dada principles were eventually modified to become the basis of surrealism in 1924. The literary manifestations of Dada were mostly nonsense poems—meaningless random combinations of words—which were read in public.

Bibliography

See R. Short, Dada and Surrealism (1980); S. C. Foster, ed., Dada-Dimensions (1985); H. Richter, Dada: Art and Anti-Art (1985); R. Motherwell, ed., The Dada Painters and Poets (1951, 2d ed. 1989); A. Codrescu, The Posthuman Dada Guide (2009); J. Rasula, Destruction Was My Beatrice (2015).

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Dada

, Dadaism
a nihilistic artistic movement of the early 20th century in W Europe and the US, founded on principles of irrationality, incongruity, and irreverence towards accepted aesthetic criteria
www.peak.org/~dadaist/English/Graphics
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
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As feminist and gender theory and studies have evolved, Dada's historical narrative has changed to account for the participation of women.
As for the manner it has been invented, the term Dada emerged without having a particular meaning.
By putting everything in public, you're showing the community your achievement," says Dada.
Inspired by Dada, a movement developed by the reviewer, who can't resist being self-referential.
Influenced by Bakunin's ideas, Ball and his friends started to apply his theories by rejecting authority, institutional power and the state, which Ball considered "to be Dada in political disguise", to their new mode of art creation.
"Many happy returns of the day dada! The man who changed the face of Indian cricket.
Mr Dada indicated that it was during consultations with the minister of health that an urgent need for a clinic in Kumakwane was identified and it was then agreed that the foundation would build a 20-roomed clinic, which included a maternity wing and a general outpatient wing.
Dada, however, said that the certification was good as it would help those who did not choose to teach as a profession initially but due to lack of job found themselves in the classrooms.
Dada KD believes the phenomenon of electing musicians to lead the association, had hindered the progress of Ghanaian music, with issues of conflict of interest derailing the progress of Ghanaian music.
Meanwhile, Dada Qadir Ranto thanked the speakers and added whatever he is today that is result of late Rasool Bux Palijo`s phlosophy and education.