Daedala


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Daedala

Spring
This is the name given to two festivals held in ancient Boeotia, which was a part of Greece, in honor of the reconciliation of Hera and Zeus. According to the myth, Hera and Zeus quarreled and Hera went away to Euboea and refused to return to his bed. To trick her into coming back and on the advice of Cithaeron, Zeus dressed up a carved oak-trunk to resemble a bride and let it be known that he planned to marry Plataea, the daughter of Asopus. Hera was so angry she tore the clothes from the statue, discovered the deception, and was so pleased that the two were reconciled.
The Little Daedala, held every six years, involved going to an ancient oak grove and cutting down trees for images. Every 59 or 60 years the Great Daedala was held, and all Boeotia joined in the celebration. All the images that had been collected over the years during the Little Daedala were carried to the top of Mt. Cithaeron, where they were burned on an altar along with sacrifices to Zeus and Hera.
SOURCES:
DictFolkMyth-1984, p. 273
NewCentClassHandbk-1962, p. 356
Holidays, Festivals, and Celebrations of the World Dictionary, Fourth Edition. © 2010 by Omnigraphics, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
"Daedala Lingua: Crafted Speech in De Rerum Natura." AJP 126: 527-85.
Daedala is sufficiently uncommmon to remind us that it is at the approach of Venus in Book I that the daedala tellus spreads its flowers (I.7);(16) rident aequora ponti adds the author in his proem, and the generation of saecla is the outcome of this all-pervading love (I.8).
(16.) Daedala is used of earth or nature at I.7, I.228, and V.234; of artefacts at II.505 and V.1451; of the tongue at IV.551.
It is noteworthy that despite the Carmelite poet's opposition to Epicureanism, manifest in his reference to God and the saints, in his repertoire of cosmic themes he explicitly evokes Lucretius with the phrase "curiouslywrought earth" (daedala terra).
Sunt ea quae profert aer, quae parturit aequor / Quae generat pingui daedala terra sinu / Multicolor facies agri silvaeque comantes / Multisonae volucres multivagaeque ferae / Sunt sophiae partes est ingeniosa mathesis / verbaque clamosi litigiosa fori / Sunt hominum vitae; sunt digna negocia versu / plurima gesta foris, plurima gesta domi.
(9) The phrase daedala tellus also recalls Venus as does, of course, the word almae.