Daggoo

Daggoo

African savage and crew member of the Pequod. [Am. Lit.: Moby Dick]
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In his youth Daggoo had voluntarily shipped on board of a whaler, lying in a lonely bay on his native coast.
With a long, weary hoist the jaw is dragged on board, as if it were an anchor; and when the proper time comes --some few days after the other work --Queequeg, Daggoo, and Tashtego, being all accomplished dentists, are set to drawing teeth.
Tashtego, Daggoo and Queequeg are all native pagans and cannibals, and what Ishmael calls "Isolatoes") The word kokovoko may have been meant by Melville to allude to the Hawaiian koko meaning "blood" or "rainbow-hued" (Pukui & Elbert 1986: 161), both significances pointing to life and abundance, while the rainbow (Hebrew qeshet) has an extended religious significance as a token of the covenant between God and Noah and all living beings--an agreement that never again a Flood will wipe away life on Earth.
Deepening his own reading of Atufal, for example, Stuckey links Daggoo, the African harpooner aboard the Pequod, with an Ashantee warrior in Dupuis who sings a song of death to suggest in turn that Atufal might be patterned after Daggoo.
El tercer arponero era Daggoo, un negro gigantesco y salvaje.
The Ahab in Green Grass, Running Water also articulates overtly the discourses of race and European empire that circulate throughout Moby-Dick and render Tashtego, the African-descended Daggoo, and the Pacific Islander Queequeg as doomed noble savages and exotic traces of a fundamental human identity.
The Actor Manager, Father Mapple, Ahab David Purdham Young Actor, Ishmael Tom Story Actor With Newspaper, Stubb Richard Ruiz A Member of the Company, Flask, Masthead Elliott Simons A Serious Actor, Starbuck Casey Biggs A Cynical Actor, Elijah, Carpenter, Daggoo Todd Anthony-Jackson An Old Pro, Peleg, "Rachel" William Swan Young Actress, Pip Careena Melia Stage Manager, Queequeg, "Bachelor" Mike Dowling Tashtego Desi Jevon Swaymaster Oliver Butler Members of the Company, Sailors J.
Earlier, in chapter 40, the old Manxman sees Daggoo and the Spaniard about to fight, and comments about "the ringed horizon": "In that ring Cain struck Abel.
In addition, there are three major harpooners: the Polynesian king Queequeg, the imperial Negro Daggoo, and Tashtego, an imposing American Indian who "seemed like the son of the Prince of the Power of Air.
Finally, he amplifies the reputation of Moby Dick: "aye, Queequeg, the harpoons lie all twisted and wrenched in him; aye, Daggoo, his spout is a big one, like a whole shock of wheat, and white as a pile of our Nantucket wool after the great annual sheep-shearing; aye, Tashtego, and he fan-tails like a split jib in a squall.
The three harpooners of the ship Pequod in Herman Melville's Moby-Dick (1851), Queequeg, Daggoo, and Tashtego, are other examples of the noble savage, as is the character of John the Savage in Aldous Huxley's Brave New World (1932).
Dough-Boy, the pale, bread-faced, dull-witted steward who deathly afraid of Queequeg, Tashtego, and Daggoo does his best to satisfy their enormous appetites.