daemon

(redirected from Daimonic)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

daemon

[′dē·mən]
(computer science)
In Unix, a program that runs in the background, such as a server.

daemon

(operating system)
/day'mn/ or /dee'mn/ (From the mythological meaning, later rationalised as the acronym "Disk And Execution MONitor") A program that is not invoked explicitly, but lies dormant waiting for some condition(s) to occur. The idea is that the perpetrator of the condition need not be aware that a daemon is lurking (though often a program will commit an action only because it knows that it will implicitly invoke a daemon).

For example, under ITS writing a file on the LPT spooler's directory would invoke the spooling daemon, which would then print the file. The advantage is that programs wanting files printed need neither compete for access to, nor understand any idiosyncrasies of, the LPT. They simply enter their implicit requests and let the daemon decide what to do with them. Daemons are usually spawned automatically by the system, and may either live forever or be regenerated at intervals.

Unix systems run many daemons, chiefly to handle requests for services from other hosts on a network. Most of these are now started as required by a single real daemon, inetd, rather than running continuously. Examples are cron (local timed command execution), rshd (remote command execution), rlogind and telnetd (remote login), ftpd, nfsd (file transfer), lpd (printing).

Daemon and demon are often used interchangeably, but seem to have distinct connotations (see demon). The term "daemon" was introduced to computing by CTSS people (who pronounced it /dee'mon/) and used it to refer to what ITS called a dragon.

daemon

Pronounced "dee-mun" as in the word for devil, as well as "day-mun," a daemon is a Unix/Linux program that executes in the background ready to perform an operation when required. Functioning like an extension to the operating system, a daemon is usually an unattended process that is initiated at startup. Typical daemons are print spoolers and email handlers or a scheduler that starts up another process at a designated time. The term comes from Greek mythology, meaning "guardian spirit." See agent and mailer-daemon.
References in periodicals archive ?
We humans have a primal, innate fear of the daimonic, and feel great anxiety about our daimonic impulsions or tendencies, which is why we avoid them.
The word daimonic in the original Greek meant some division in consciousness through which 'divine' activity could be glimpsed--either for good or for evil.
Corinth is thus an appropriate setting for a story of sexual enchantment by a daimonic woman.
The descriptions of the daimon are the locus of the ambiguity: is the daimonic voice "immanentizing" and earthly, or is it estranging and otherwordly?
The poet's sensibility reflects that same contradictory and unifying tension in the daimonic relationship between the cat and himself.
One is that it occupies a middle region between extremes, expressed in a variety of ways: Socrates is daimonic or satyric (since, like satyr plays, the dialogues are neither tragic nor comic) between merely changing beasts and perfectly unchanging natures, between naturalism and conventionalism, between Parmenidean singularity and Heraclitean flux.
8) Inspiration is divine madness (theia mania), enthusiasm, possession by the daimonic elements.
The very divine and daimonic forces that brought down the Persian empire might just as easily strike down the Athenians should they too seek domination.
3), whereas we hear repeatedly of [GREEK TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] or [GREEK TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] (`the god', `the gods', or `the [abstract] divine'), [GREEK TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] and [GREEK TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] (`those superior', `the [abstract] superior'), a [GREEK TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] or [GREEK TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] or [GREEK TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] or [GREEK TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] (`daimon, daimons, the [abstract] daimonic, some daimonic thing'--like the daimonion that Socrates could hear).
For Nashe, prose is potentially dishonest, and style daimonic.
This finding is interesting as it suggests that, with respect to the development of positive life regard, it is important for individuals not only to establish intimate relationships but also to actualize and share with others their daimonic nature, that is to say, their tendency towards both the positive and the negative, evil as well as good (May, 1982).
1975); see also Rollo May, Love and Will 38 (1969) (stating that sex "remains the power of procreation, the drive which perpetuates the race, the source at once of the human being's most intense pleasure and his most pervasive anxietyt;] [i]t can, in its daimonic form, hurl the individual into sloughs of despond, and, when allied with eros, it can lift him out of his despondency into orbits of ecstasy').