Damascenes


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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Damascenes

 

(also damaskini), important manuscripts of Bulgarian literature of the 17th and 18th centuries; manuscript collections of religious and didactic works (lives of the saints, apocryphal works, exhortations, and sermons). They include translations from the Treasury (Thesauros) by the 16th-century Greek preacher Damascene the Studite (hence their name). The copies of various versions often reflect the patriotic outlook of their compilers, contemporary events, and aspects of Bulgarian life. Some even include religious tales drawn from folklore. The manuscripts can be found in libraries in Bulgaria and the USSR.

REFERENCES

Petkanova-Toteva, D. Damaskinite v bulgarskata literatura. Sofia, 1965.
Demina, E. Tikhonravovskii damaskin: Bolgarskii pamiatnik XVII v, part 1. Sofia, 1968.
The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Third on the list of endangered products is the Damascene Brocade, or natural silk textiles.
Wood inlaying craft is a very ancient anddistinguished Damascene handmade craft, where itbrought together the art and profession, aspecialist in wood inlaying, Arafat Utta Bashitold SANA.
DAMASCUS: During a recent meeting of Damascene merchants, talk turned to the case of a colleague detained by Syria's powerful and dreaded state security apparatus.
Some Damascenes now sarcastically call it the Triangle of Security, lampooning its fast-shrinking area.
In this author's study of consumer culture in mid-eighteenth-century Damascus, his use of unpublished manuscripts authored by the renowned Damascene intellectual 'ABd al-Ghani al-Nabulsi (thus in the volume) (consulted by Grehan in the Suleymaniye Library, Istanbul), which are contemporaneous with the inventories studied for this book, along with chronicles penned by the eighteenth-century Damascene Ahmad al-Budayri and earlier ones in Damascus such as the work by Ibn Kan'an, supplement and contextualize Grehan's information obtained from the probate inventories.
Yet as far as most Damascenes were concerned--the coffee houses, notwithstanding--the "inherent fragility of economic life," continued to dictate frugality as well as anxiety.
Customers streamed in non-stop to bathe and relax, playing cards, munching on Damascene sweets, singing, and hanging out with friends.
"The rebels need to show some regard for our lives," cried one Damascene who supports the rebels.
(39) So the practice of good manners--or among less educated Damascenes, of simple self-restraint in word and deed--was not merely an idle preference; it brought tangible benefits to the social order that everyone recognized.
Yasser's clientele has dwindled in number, part of the mass exodus of thousands of Damascenes who fled abroad.
Clashes with rebels have subsided, and although gunfire and shelling could be heard sporadically in the distance, Damascenes no longer wake up to the sounds of a war zone.
The first major problem, typical of many works that deal with historical representations, is that Berger never quite decides whether it is the themes touched upon in his sources or the ways in which these are understood and treated by the Damascene biographers, that is his real object of inquiry.