Damascus, Kingdom of

The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Damascus, Kingdom of

 

in antiquity, a state in Syria. Known from Assyro-Babylonian and Egyptian sources and from the Bible, Damascus was apparently founded in the 11th and the beginning of the tenth century B.C. by the Aramaeans, who had appeared in the region of Damascus around the 12th century. At the beginning of the tenth century the Kingdom of Damascus was subordinate to the Kingdom of Israel, but it became independent in the middle of the century.

Under kings Tabrimmon and Ben-Hadad I (ruled c. 914–880) the Kingdom of Damascus dominated Syria and Palestine by heading a coalition of many states. Under the leadership of King Ben Hadad II (c. 880–844) an anti-Assyrian coalition was formed. Until its collapse the Kingdom of Damascus waged wars against the Kingdom of Israel. Under King Hazail (c. 844–804) the Kingdom of Damascus became a tributary of Assyria. Its power increased from the beginning of the eighth century under King Ben-Hadad III, who headed the 17 kingdoms of Syria and successfully repelled an Assyrian invasion. The authority of the Kingdom of Damascus during this period extended to northern Syria. In 732 B.C. the Kingdom of Damascus ceased to exist, and its territory was turned into a province of the Assyrian state.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.