Danaids


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Danaids

 

in Greek mythology, the 50 daughters of Danaus, son of the Egyptian king Belus. In an attempt to escape the pursuit of the 50 sons of Aegyptus, the brother of Danaus. the Danaids and their father fled to Argos, where they were overtaken by Aegyptus’ sons who demanded that Danaus give his daughters to them in marriage. Bowing to force, Danaus agreed to the marriage of his daughters, but ordered them to kill their husbands on their wedding night. All of the Danaids except one, who became the progenitrix of the kings of Argos, carried out their father’s command. According to one version of the myth, the Daxiaids had to atone for their crime by eternally filling a bottomless jar with water in the underworld. This is the origin of the expressions “a Danaid jar” and “labor of the Danaids,” which signify useless and unending labor.

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The image of the Danaids is the only allusion in the Thebaid to any family connection with Adrastus.
Only the main building of the temple, its gilded decorations (14) and whiteness (line 9), (15) as well as the statues of the Danaids, can with any certainty be regarded as features of the temple so famous or conspicuous, that the poet could not leave them out.
What of the brides murdering their husbands on the first night as they sleep, as in the Danaid trilogy of Aeschylus?
Putnam, `Virgil's Danaid Ecphrasis', ICS 19 (1994), 171-89, who, however, takes the ecphrasis ultimately to imply a fairly clear-cut condemnation of Aeneas (and Augustus).
He then moves on to a discussion of allegory in the Suppliants in which he describes and analyzes the story of the Danaids and Aphrodite.
14.3.2) might also better fit the Danaids' desire that the Egyptians be wrecked off the [GREEK TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] than the Cilician promontory, which was not known for its poor weather.(13)
As the play opens, the Danaids (born in Egypt though of Greek descent) have fled with their father to Argos in Greece in order to avoid forced marriage with their cousins, the sons of Aegyptus.
The doors and portico of the Temple of Palatine Apollo, depicting the rescue of Delphi from the Celts and part of the story of the Danaids, have attracted particular attention.(3) The effect on poets (Virg.
There are even similarities in the details they supply about their place in the underworld: both women pass over water (4.7.59-60; 4.11.15-16), mention the crime of the Danaids (4.7.67-68; 4.11.27-28), and refer to Cybele in connection with good women (4.7.61; 4.11.51).