Empididae

(redirected from Dance fly)

Empididae

[em′pid·ə‚dē]
(invertebrate zoology)
The dance flies, a family of orthorrhaphous dipteran insects in the series Nematocera.

Empididae

 

a family of dipterous insects. The body, which measures up to 15 mm in length, is elongate and slightly downy, with long legs and a needle-like proboscis. Empididae are widely distributed over the earth and are especially numerous in forests. There are approximately 2,800 species. In summer the insects swarm, performing complex mating dances. They are predators of smaller insects. Adults are found on the leaves and trunks of trees and on flowers. The larvae develop in soil and forest humus, although some larvae are aquatic, developing in streams and small rivers.

References in periodicals archive ?
3mm, and the Dance Fly ( Drapetis wathabiensis ), measuring 2-3mm, have now been added to the list of hundreds of invertebrates already recorded on the reserve.
The Dance Fly ( Drapetis wathbaiensis ) species have been confirmed by Dr Andreas Stark from the German Entomological Institute, Senckenberg in Germany.
However, the dance fly fauna is poorly known (Yang & Yang 2004; Yang et al.
But it is actually only a means to let a dance fly.
Sinclair (Canadian Food Inspection Agency) has written an exhaustive monograph on the aquatic dance fly genus, Clinocera, a predatory insect found in temperate flowing fresh water habitats.