dandelion

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dandelion

[Eng. form of Fr.,=lion's tooth], any plant of the genus Taraxacum of the family Asteraceae (asteraster
[Gr.,=star], common name for the Asteraceae (Compositae), the aster family, in North America, name for plants of the genus Aster, sometimes called wild asters, and for a related plant more correctly called China aster (Callistephus chinensis
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 family), perennial herbs of wide distribution in temperate regions. The dandelion has a rosette of deep-toothed leaves (the name is usually attributed to this) and a bright yellow flower followed in fruit by a round head of white down, an adaptation for wind distribution of the seedlike fruits. The common dandelion (T. officinale) is native to Europe but widely naturalized. Although it is considered in the N United States chiefly as a lawn pest because of the easily dispersed seeds and the deep root, it is also cultivated both for medicine and for food. The young leaves resemble chicory and are used for salad greens and as a potherb, especially in Europe. The roots may be roasted and used as a coffee substitute. The flower heads are utilized for dandelion wine and are good forage for bees. In medicine the roots have been dried and used chiefly as a bitter tonic and laxative. The Russian dandelion (T. kok-saghyz) has been cultivated for the milky juice typical of the genus, as a source of rubber. Dandelions are classified in the division MagnoliophytaMagnoliophyta
, division of the plant kingdom consisting of those organisms commonly called the flowering plants, or angiosperms. The angiosperms have leaves, stems, and roots, and vascular, or conducting, tissue (xylem and phloem).
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, class Magnoliopsida, order Asterales, family Asteraceae.
The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/

dandelion

traditional symbol of flirtation. [Flower Symbolism: Jobes, 413]

dandelion

symbol of grief. [Flower Symbolism: Jobes, 413]
See: Grief
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

dandelion

1. a plant, Taraxacum officinale, native to Europe and Asia and naturalized as a weed in North America, having yellow rayed flowers and deeply notched basal leaves, which are used for salad or wine: family Asteraceae (composites)
2. any of several similar related plants
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
All you have to do to join in the fun is to get outside - with your son or daughter, your husband or wife, your granny or anyone else you fancy - and take a picture of a dandelion clock being blown.
WHEN I was young and time was slow, boys and girls blew away the summer days on dandelion clocks.
Oh the tick tock tick tock of those dandelion clocks, why oh why can't the time just stand still.
Photographer Mike Barratt from Frogs Design created backdrops including Christmas carols in December to blowing By Neil Atkinson Head of News neil.atkinson@examiner.co.uk dandelion clocks in May, from a Strictly dance off in February to happy Halloween pumpkins in October.
HISTORIAN and farmer John Lewis-Stempel's family have lived in Herefordshire for 700 years and a sense of history pervades this chronicle of wrens and robins, campion and dandelion clocks, moles and badgers, which charts a year in the life of his meadow, simply told month by month.
Once we had squelching, cow-patted fields of spry flies and dandelion clocks, of teeming hedgerows and ground veined by tree-roots, where spiders span while butterflies dreamed on the high-seeded grass and the gorse blazed and the blackberries grew plump for the picking fingers of mothers and children - and those fields rolled to the valleys and rivers, passing the clusters of reeds around slow, deep ponds, where the frogs spawned and the sticklebacks swam and the voles hid in whiskered holes near the splashing wellies, under the swoops of dark birds.
No candles, paper boats, nor any of the white acts of mourning, only - diaphanous as a daylight moon - the dandelion clocks blowing time away over the double grave we've laid them in.
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Rutter also presented his thoughts on innovation and design at a recent panel at Luxe Pack New York, which included Marisol Simard, president, Dandelion Clocks, an innovation consultancy; and Michelle Green-wald, CEO, Inventours.
Sitting on a bench amid the evergreens, dandelion clocks and long grass, I heard the organ and then singing from within, Thine is the Glory.
5 Silver under plate, EUR2.99, Sainsbury's; Dandelion Clocks dinner plate, EUR9.50, Sanderson for Churchill China; turquoise baubles, EUR11 for a multipack, Marks & Spencer; turquoise wine glass, EUR19.75 for four; silver beaded napkin ring, EUR4, Marks & Spencer; teal feathered bird decoration, EUR5, Dunelm Mill; silver glass candle holder, EUR6.75, Tesco; teal cracker, EUR12.75 for 6, B&Q.