Dandie Dinmont terrier


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Dandie Dinmont terrier

(dăn`dē dĭn`mŏnt), breed of hardy, long-bodied terrierterrier,
classification used by breeders and kennel clubs to designate dogs originally bred to start small game and vermin from their burrows or, in the case of several breeds in this group, to go to earth and kill their prey. Today these dogs are raised chiefly as pets.
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 developed in England and Scotland and first recorded as a distinct type in the very early 18th cent. It stands from 8 to 11 in. (20.3–27.9 cm) high at the shoulder and weighs from 18 to 24 lb (8.1–10.9 kg). The double coat consists of a mixture of soft and harsh hair about 2 in. (5.1 cm) long that gives it a crisp but not wiry texture and appearance. Its color may be pepper or mustard. Like most of the other terriers from England's northern Border districts, the Dandie Dinmont was bred to go to ground (i.e., go into an animal's den or underground shelter) in the hunting of such game as otters, badgers, and foxes. Today it is raised principally as a pet. See dogdog,
carnivorous, domesticated wolf (Canis lupus familiaris) of the family Canidae, to which the jackal, fox, and tanuki also belong. The family Canidae is sometimes referred to as the dog family, and its characteristics, e.g.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Other British breeds at risk of dying out include the deerhound and the Dandie Dinmont terrier, named after a Sir Walter Scott character.
November 6: Caledonian Dandie Dinmont Terrier Club's championship show in the Tait Hall, Kelso at 11am.
FUTURE SHOWSNovember 6: Caledonian Dandie Dinmont Terrier Club Championship show in Kelso.
FIFTY Dandie Dinmont terriers gathered in the Scottish Borders yesterday, together with their owners, to celebrate the rare and endangered breed.
The plummet in puppy numbers has led to the Kennel Club placing the Sealyham on their Vulnerable Native Breed list alongside Welsh corgis, Dandie Dinmont terriers and Otterhounds.
My latest issue of Dog World doesn't talk about "terriers." It discusses Airedale terriers, American pit bull terriers, Australian terriers, Bedlington terriers, border terriers, bull terriers, cairn terriers, Dandie Dinmont terriers, fell terriers, fox terriers, (smooth or wiry), Glen of Imaal terriers Irish terriers, Jack Russell terriers, Kerry blue terriers, Lakeland terriers, Norfolk terriers, Norwich terriers, Scottish terriers (so well described by Wodehouse as looking like Presbyterians), Sealyham terriers, slky terriers, Skye terriers, Tibetan terriers, Welsh terriers, Yorkshire terriers.
Triplets Hattie, Hamish and Haggis are Dandie Dinmont terriers, a breed the Kennel Club say is dying out.