Danegeld


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Danegeld

(dān`gĕld'), medieval land tax originally raised to buy off raiding Danes and later used for military expenditures. In England the tribute was first levied in 868, then in 871 by AlfredAlfred,
849–99, king of Wessex (871–99), sometimes called Alfred the Great, b. Wantage, Berkshire. Early Life

The youngest son of King Æthelwulf, he was sent in 853 to Rome, where the pope gave him the title of Roman consul.
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, and occasionally thereafter. Under ÆthelredÆthelred,
965?–1016, king of England (978–1016), called Æthelred the Unready [Old Eng. unrœd=without counsel]. He was the son of Edgar and the half-brother of Edward the Martyr, whom he succeeded.
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 (965?–1016) it became a regular tax, and was collected by later rulers until the 12th cent., when it was converted into tallagetallage
, Fr. taille, a type of feudal tax. In its origins tallage is not clearly distinguishable from aids (a type of feudal due), and in Germany it never developed beyond an occasional "voluntary" gift from vassal to lord.
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.

Danegeld

 

an old tax in England during the Middle Ages. It was collected for the first time from the entire country in 991 as a payment to the Scandinavians (usually called Danes in England) who had attacked England. Beginning in the early 11th century, the danegeld assumed the character of a tax and was retained even after the Scandinavian raids were over. It was a special collection at first and then was exacted more or less regularly; it laid a heavy burden on the masses. In 1051 it was abolished, but after the Norman Conquest in 1066 it was again repeatedly levied. In 1163 it was replaced by a new tax, the carucage (plough tax).

References in periodicals archive ?
Earlier generations of British and American schoolchildren familiar with this bloody epoch of English history, as well as Kipling's poetry, would not have failed to see the Danegeld lesson in the recent bailouts of the Wall Street pirates.
The growing dissatisfaction with huge amounts of "Danegeld ransom" being paid out annually by UK taxpayers to Brussels is draining an already strained UK economic system, holding up a speedy recovery from near bankruptcy.
From the historical summary page, users can also discover the meanings of "carucate," "danegeld," "scutage," and "tallage," as well as visit the Tax History Project via the provided external link.
It seems to have been an attempt to bring a much older tax, the danegeld, (25) up to date, but was unsuccessful and unpopular.
But there is a big problem with Danegeld: the Dane always comes back for more.
Juries of shires, hundred, and village delivered verdicts on geld liability--an assessment in hides or carucates to all the dues owed by free men--and arrears of Danegeld were collected.
It has been pointed out by Norwegian scholars that, in the time of the great danegeld payments, the two Norwegian kings, Olafr Tryggvason and Olafr Haraldsson, came from England and used the money acquired there to form friendship-alliances with the local magnates, thus "buying" themselves the kingdom of Norway
Meanwhile he does not address, much less adduce any evidence to refute, the points of the piece--namely that to save his job Lawrence Summers backed down from the defense of free inquiry and granted $50 million in Danegeld to the feminist lobby; that rather than addressing Ward Churchill's multifaceted fraud, Elizabeth Hoffman evoked the tired bogeyman of McCarthyism; that Denice Denton, though praising diversity at a time of budget cutbacks for staff, created a special U.C.
When I first picked up Max Boot's book, however, the first Kipling poem that came to mind, oddly enough, was not "The White Man's Burden," but his lesser known "Danegeld," It is always a temptation for a rich and lazy nation, To puff and look important and to say:-- "Though we know we should defeat you, we have not the time to meet you, We will therefore pay you cash to go away." And that is called paying the Dane-geld; But we've proved it again and again, That if once you have paid him the Dane-geld You never get rid of the Dane.
Tony Martin won the Duke of Gloucester Memorial Hunters' Chase for the second year running when Ships Decanter, ridden by his friend John Nicholl, beat Danegeld by 13 lengths.
Sinclair, who clearly loves money, takes us from Danegeld to the nickel and brass lump we use today, via all the glory years when the British quid dominated the world.