Danegeld


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Danegeld

(dān`gĕld'), medieval land tax originally raised to buy off raiding Danes and later used for military expenditures. In England the tribute was first levied in 868, then in 871 by AlfredAlfred,
849–99, king of Wessex (871–99), sometimes called Alfred the Great, b. Wantage, Berkshire. Early Life

The youngest son of King Æthelwulf, he was sent in 853 to Rome, where the pope gave him the title of Roman consul.
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, and occasionally thereafter. Under ÆthelredÆthelred,
965?–1016, king of England (978–1016), called Æthelred the Unready [Old Eng. unrœd=without counsel]. He was the son of Edgar and the half-brother of Edward the Martyr, whom he succeeded.
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 (965?–1016) it became a regular tax, and was collected by later rulers until the 12th cent., when it was converted into tallagetallage
, Fr. taille, a type of feudal tax. In its origins tallage is not clearly distinguishable from aids (a type of feudal due), and in Germany it never developed beyond an occasional "voluntary" gift from vassal to lord.
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.

Danegeld

 

an old tax in England during the Middle Ages. It was collected for the first time from the entire country in 991 as a payment to the Scandinavians (usually called Danes in England) who had attacked England. Beginning in the early 11th century, the danegeld assumed the character of a tax and was retained even after the Scandinavian raids were over. It was a special collection at first and then was exacted more or less regularly; it laid a heavy burden on the masses. In 1051 it was abolished, but after the Norman Conquest in 1066 it was again repeatedly levied. In 1163 it was replaced by a new tax, the carucage (plough tax).

References in periodicals archive ?
The 2008 mortgage crisis, which morphed into a global financial crisis, initiated an ongoing series of Danegeld payoffs to some of the biggest gold-plated piratical firms on the planet: Goldman Sachs, Citigroup, Morgan Stanley, Merrill Lynch, JPMorgan Chase, HSBC, Bank of America, Barclays, Royal Bank of Scotland, UBS, Wachovia, AIG, Credit Suisse.
This new direction is evident not only from the attempt to develop carucage as a replacement for danegeld, but from the increasing frequency with which taxes such as scutage and taxes on movables were levied.
Sinclair, who clearly loves money, takes us from Danegeld to the nickel and brass lump we use today, via all the glory years when the British quid dominated the world.
Let us consider the possibility, then, that the king's ineffective response to Olaf Tryggvason's raids in 991, the precedent-setting payment of Danegeld, represented a logical extension of the doctrine of Christus domini.
Danegeld remembered: Taxing further the coin head illusion.
Lean argue that an increase in minting in Maldon and Colchester in the period 991-1003 was not necessarily linked to the need to pay Danegeld.
Born about 968, the son of King Edgar and his second wife Elfthryth; became King after his older half-brother Edward (later Saint Edward the Martyr) was murdered while visiting him at Corfe Gate, Dorset (March 18, 978); his reign saw a recurrence of Danish raids after 980, and the failure of armed resistance led to the payment of the Danegeld to buy off the raiders (991); a weak monarch, he assented to the massacre of Danish settlers (November 1002) and so provoked a major Danish invasion by Sweyn in retribution (1003); fled to France after Sweyn was accepted as King (1013), but returned on Sweyn's death to dispute the succession with Canute (1014); died at London in the midst of war with Canute (April 23, 1016).
Already I am required to buy bags of mini Mars bars and Maltesers in preparation of juvenile hordes requesting the modern equivalent of danegeld.
Think of it as Danegeld or better still, MacDanegeld
THE latest idea to pay Taliban leaders to lay down their weapons reminds me of an old Celtic proverb: "Those who pay Danegeld shall be never free of the Dane for he shall return year upon year to demand it again".
In some years half the money minted at the English mints (mostly silver pennies) went in Danegeld.
Walk that path and we'll be asking the Danes to repay the danegeld they got from Ethelred the Unready, compensation from the Romans for our hurt feelings in 55BC and handouts to the Irish families whose ancestors died in the Great Famine in the 1850s - come to think of it, though, Blair has already expressed his greasy sorrow over this.