Danelaw


Also found in: Dictionary, Wikipedia.
Related to Danelaw: Danegeld

Danelaw

(dān`lô'), originally the body of law that prevailed in the part of England occupied by the Danes after the treaty of King AlfredAlfred,
849–99, king of Wessex (871–99), sometimes called Alfred the Great, b. Wantage, Berkshire. Early Life

The youngest son of King Æthelwulf, he was sent in 853 to Rome, where the pope gave him the title of Roman consul.
..... Click the link for more information.
 with Guthrum in 886. It soon came to mean also the area in which Danish law obtained; according to the treaty, the boundary between England and Danelaw ran "up the Thames, and then up the Lea … to its source, then straight to Bedford and then up the Ouse to Watling Street." The Danelaw comprised four main regions: Northumbria; the areas around and including the boroughs of Lincoln, Nottingham, Derby, Leicester, and Stamford; East Anglia; and the SE Midlands. Though the English kings soon brought the Danelaw back under their rule, they did not attempt to interfere with the laws and customs of the area, many of which survived until after the Norman Conquest.

Bibliography

See D. Whitelock, The Norman Conquest: its Setting and Impact (1968); F. M. Stenton, The Free Peasantry of the Northern Danelaw (1926, repr. 1969) and Anglo-Saxon England (3d ed. 1971).

Danelaw

, Danelagh
the northern, central and eastern parts of Anglo-Saxon England in which Danish law and custom were observed
References in periodicals archive ?
After this discussion the author moves away from the higher administrative organization and examines society at the level of farms and villages, concentrating on the status and role of the ceorl, the socio-economic structure of the Danelaw, the different types and sizes of tenements, and the stratification, levels of freedom and various obligations of the landholders.
Taking a step back from the detail, the Cuerdale Hoard presents an arresting panorama: from a faint trail of mostly old Scandinavian silver, combined with a substantial batch of recently-acquired coins from the Continent; a small though equally recent number of Arabic dirhams, revealing active ties through Russia (one coin is a Volga Bulghar imitation); through spoils of near-contemporary Anglo-Saxon coins as well as Irish and Hiberno-Scandinavian bullion; to the latest component, a newly-established Danelaw coinage based closely on Frankish models, and containing die-links with genuine Frankish reverses.
the English people, particularly the Anglo-Saxons and their Viking allies, chafed under the tyranny of the Norman King John, and they looked for leadership to the Archbishop of Canterbury, Stephen Langton, of Lincolnshire, a Viking settlement north of the Danelaw.
Many of these same Norse termini technici may have had an impact, less well documented, on the Old English of the Danelaw, an impact strengthened by the later import of Norman French to Britain, and then made newly evident in the emergence of Middle English from this complex linguistic mix.
Scandinavian elements are not characteristic of names in England outside the Danelaw.
Ironically, this "Other" soon became assimilated into the geographical and national homeland; by the middle of the ninth century much of eastern England had been settled by Danish immigrants in the Danelaw.
But the conquest of the Danelaw was continued by his son, Edward The Elder, and unification was completed by his grandson, Athelsten.
Julia Barrow agrees that the `new seigneurial parish churches, of the later tenth-century Danelaw were opportunities to be seized in a freer land market by a new Anglo-Danish upper class.
The Vikings were to go on to control the area north of the line - the Danelaw.
Watling Street became the border of the Danelaw, land ceded to the Danes by King Alfred to stop them attacking the south of Britain.
Hambleside Danelaw to Unveil GRP Insulated Wall Panel II-28
The first recorded spelling of the Scotney name is that of Hugo de Scotini, which was dated 1143, in the Danelaw Rolls of the county of Lincoln.