Danger Cave

Danger Cave

 

a cave near the city of Wendover, Utah (USA), one of the most ancient settlements of hunters and gatherers in North America. The cave was investigated by the American archaeologist J. D. Jennings between 1949 and 1953. The oldest remains are six small hearths and several crude implements made of stone chips. Above, separated by a layer of bat guano, lay four cultural levels in which stone scrapers, chipped spear heads, seed grinders, the remains of mats, and articles made of wood and bone were found. The two upper layers contained a bow and arrows, articles made of skin, and ceramics. Animal bones (mountain goat and antelope, among others) were also discovered in the cave. Radiocarbon dating of the lower layer is 11,300 years and that of the upper layer, 1,900 years.

REFERENCE

Jennings, J. D. “Danger Cave.” Memoirs of the Society for American Archaeology, no. 14. Supplement to American Antiquity, 1957, vol. 23, no. 2, part 2.
References in periodicals archive ?
Darcy Morey, a faculty member at Radford University who has studied dog evolution for decades, said a study from the 1980s dated a dog found at Danger Cave, Utah, at between 9,000 and 10,000 years old.