Darkness at Noon


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Darkness at Noon

Communists accused of having betrayed party principles are imprisoned, tortured, and executed. [Br. Lit.: Weiss, 117]
References in periodicals archive ?
Will, the conservative writer and commentator, in a June 2 interview in The New York Times Book Review, said, "To understand the Republican Party's descent into a cult, and congressional Republicans' loyalty-as-lobotomy, read Arthur Koestler's novel of the Soviet Union in the 1930's, 'Darkness at Noon.' Pay particular attention to Gletkin, the embodiment of the apparatchik mentality."
Omer-Sherman presents a nuanced profile of Koestler's novel Thieves in the Night (which has long been eclipsed by that author's magnum opus, Darkness at Noon), comparing and contrasting the book's "morally troubling" support for terrorism as a means of expelling the British from Mandate Palestine with other, similar works on the same theme, such as Leon Uris's ever more popular Exodus.
What is new, as we shall now observe, is the suggestion that Darkness at Noon and Koestler's autobiographies resonate with Ahabian dictatorship and with the example of a Melvillean narrator inclined toward exegetical self-revival.
In his 1940 novel Darkness at Noon, the story of a political prisoner, Rubashov, and his final days in solitary, Koestler brings to life a whole world and the searching mind of a narrator from a tiny cell just six paces wide.
The country needs good governance, which in turn requires a Social Revolution not in the words of Hegel, the owl of Minerva "which stretches its wings when history has gone grey upon grey;" and there is darkness at noon.
With all this making him a fascinating - though equally repellent figure, and his literary debut dates from 1940 with Arthur Koestler's Darkness at Noon. Set in 1938 during the Stalinist Great Purge and dealing with the fate of an Old Bolshevik, it doesn't name either the Soviet regime or its leader, who are just referred to as 'the Party' and 'Number One', but the reference is obvious.
There is something about "darkness at noon", or at any time during daylight hours, that captures the imagination and makes us recall stories in which eclipses have been used to good effect - one of them being an all-time favourite: A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court.
His great short Novel Darkness At Noon is a brilliant account of the interrogations of one of the Old Bolsheviks who were put on trial in Moscow in the late 1930s.
That Darkness at Noon, in this seventy-fifth anniversary year of its publication in the United States, continues to be read and admired is indeed an impressive feat.
This perfect episode delivers as much comedy as it does drama - from the glimpses of Alicia's favourite TV show Darkness At Noon playing in the background, to daughter Grace's choir practice, to the delicious sound of Alicia pouring a very large glass of wine.
As is The Good Wife's way, this perfect episode delivers as much comedy as it does drama - from the glimpses of Alicia's favourite TV show Darkness At Noon playing in the background, to daughter Grace's choir practice, to the delicious sound of Alicia pouring a very large glass of wine.