Darkul Kuiukova

Kuiukova, Darkul’

 

Born May 15, 1919, in the village of Oktiabr’skoe, now in Osh Oblast. Soviet Kirghiz actress; People’s Artist of the USSR (1967). Member of the CPSU since 1944.

Kuiukova joined the Kirghiz Children’s Theater (in Frunze) in 1936, mainly in male impersonation roles. She has been one of the leading actresses of the Kirghiz Dramatic Theater (in Frunze) since 1941. She plays heroic, spiritually strong Kirghiz women—for example, Akchaim (Sarynzhi by Eshmambetov), Aiganysh (Kurmanbek by Dzhantoshev), Dzhanyl (Dzhanyl by Malikov and Kuttubaev), and Tolgonai (Mother’s Field, based on the Aitmatov work). Her ability to create incisively satirical portraits and domineering characters was demonstrated in such roles as Panova (Liubov’ Iarovaia by Trenev), Natal’ia Kovshik (The Snowball-tree Grove by Korneichuk), Maisalbiubiu (The Narrow Gorge by Abdumomunov), Melan’ia (Egor Bulychev and the Others by Gorky), Kabanikha (The Thunderstorm by Ostrovskii), and Goneril (King Lear by Shakespeare).

Kuiukova was a deputy to the seventh convocation of the Supreme Soviet of the Kirghiz SSR. She received the Order of the Red Banner of Labor and various medals.

References in periodicals archive ?
She would play a role of Tolgonai for two hours, then we would go somewhere to eat where there would be lots of people, and again she would play Tolgonai." Darkul Kuiukova was known to be a tireless worker who never neglected her large family.
During Soviet times people believed that actresses were frivolous and would take the wrong path." (33) But it was Darkul Kuiukova and Kumushalieva who invited akyns to sing until dawn, and who convinced her parents that singing and acting were respectable professions, even for a girl.
Zamirbek Soronbaev--a relative of Baken Kydykeeva, an actor, and a director with the esteemed title "People's Artist of the Kyrgyz Republic"--talked about Darkul Kuiukova in more detail.
People's Artist of the Soviet Union Darkul Kuiukova was his and his wife's mentor.
Darkul Kuiukova's generosity with her students seemed like an extension of her life at home.