Darwin's finch


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Darwin's finch

[¦där·winz ′finch]
(vertebrate zoology)
A bird of the subfamily Fringillidae; Darwin studied the variation of these birds and used his data as evidence for his theory of evolution by natural selection.
References in periodicals archive ?
This larger of Darwin's finches had a different song than the three native finches on the island.
The cactus finch, one of 13 closely related Darwin's finches unique to the Galapagos, has a specially adapted beak, sturdy enough to open a hole in the side of the tough fruit.
Phenotypic and genetic effects of hybridization in Darwin's finches. Evolution 48: 297-316.
Mating patterns of Darwin's finch hybrids determined by song and morphology.
In contrast depleting factors will predominate in the unique colonization episodes typical of remote oceanic islands, for example, perhaps in the original colonization of the Galapagos archipelago by the ancestors of modern Darwin's finches.
The study of Darwin's finches on Daphne Major island is an exemplar.
Darwin's finch hybrids provide no evidence of heterosis in size; those that deviate from expected size under a strictly additive model are small rather than large.
The finding may help explain how Darwin's finches evolved into 18 species in an evolutionarily speedy 1 million to 2 million years.
Darwin's finches have long been considered a model population for study of adaptive radiation, speciation, and population biology.
To explore the rugged volcanic terrain and see marine iguanas, giant tortoises, Darwin's finches and other marvels of nature - it was like my illustrated Origin of Species come to fife, It was an awe-inspiring experience to stand on the beach where Darwin first made landfall in the Galapagos.
Whether it's Darwin's finches, Lake Malawi's cichlids or Australia's marsupials, they all have one thing in common--they have diversified to suit their environments.
Indeed, readers are reminded that although "Darwin's finches" are the archipelago's iconic birds, one can distinguish many of the islands by other animals as well (e.g., mockingbirds, iguanas, lizards, tortoises, and many plants).