Darwin's theory


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Related to Darwin's theory: Darwin's theory of evolution

Darwin's theory

[¦där·winz ′thē·ə·rē]
(biology)
References in periodicals archive ?
Darwin's Theory of Evolution by natural selection can also be applied in the stock market.
Darwin's theory suggests that organisms arise and develop through natural selection and that small inherited variations among a species give them a better chance to survive and produce further generations.
21 ( ANI ): Minister of State for Human Resource Development Satyapal Singh on Saturday claimed that Charles Darwin's Theory of Evolution was "scientifically wrong" and needed to be changed in all the educational curriculums.
I, of course, refer to cyclists, not the Lycra clad gladiators that ride two abreast, jump red lights (Darwin's theory) and under-take buses, but the mountain bike louts who insist you "move over".
Charles Darwin's theory of evolution is rejected by both Christian and Muslim creationists, who believe God created the world as described in the Bible and the Koran, making the universe and all living things in six days.
So it's not surprising that Darwin's theory was viewed through the prism of the slavery debate.
Suffice it to say that The Kingdom of Speech relegates Darwin's theory of evolution to the level where it belongs, a hypothetical explanation, beyond empirical confirmation.
Darwin's theory of evolution suggests animals evolve over generations through a process of natural selection.
The Paradox of Evolution: The Strange Relationship Between Natural Selection and Reproduction considers the contradictions in two basic contentions of Darwin's theory of natural selection and reproduction, and comes from a scientist who claims that the evolution of life's systems isn't due to natural selection, but to other factors.
According to the well-known Harvard biologist Ernst Mayr, Charles Darwin's theory of evolution actually consists of five separate theories.
In 11 papers from an October 2009 conference in Belgrade, scholars of philosophy offer some contemporary perspectives on the potential of Darwin's theory of evolution for present and future generations.
Research published in the journal Current Biology shows that evolution's "Big Bang" during the Cambrian period between 540 and 520 million years ago can be explained scientifically and fits in with Darwin's theory of natural selection, scientists have said.