data mart

(redirected from Datamart)

data mart

(database)
A type of data warehouse designed primarily to address a specific function or department's needs, as opposed to a data warehouse which is traditionally meant to address the needs of the organisation from an enterprise perspective. In addition, a data mart often uses aggregation or summarisation of the data to enhance query performance. However, it is important to maintain the ability to access the underlying base data to enable drill-down analysis as necessary.
This article is provided by FOLDOC - Free Online Dictionary of Computing (foldoc.org)

data mart

A subset of a data warehouse for a single department or function. A data mart may have tens of gigabytes of data rather than hundreds of gigabytes for the entire enterprise. See data warehouse.
Copyright © 1981-2019 by The Computer Language Company Inc. All Rights reserved. THIS DEFINITION IS FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY. All other reproduction is strictly prohibited without permission from the publisher.
References in periodicals archive ?
Using data from 2008 to 2016 in the Optum Clinformatics DataMart deidentified commercial claims database, the researchers performed a repeated cross-sectional analysis of oral antibiotic prescriptions associated with encounters for surgical procedures performed by dermatologists.
* DataMart is an SQL-based historical and SCADA system that stores high-resolution scanner data and process measurements for analysis.
Lackenby et al., "A new laboratory-based surveillance system (Respiratory DataMart System) for influenza and other respiratory viruses in England: results and experience from 2009 to 2012," Euro Surveillance, vol.
Additionally, in 2004 the National Counterterrorism Center was tasked with managing the Terrorist Identities Datamart Environment, intended to be the government's central repository of information relating to international terrorist identities.
Fists were at issue here because the review focused, in large part, on the failure to include Umar Farouk on the United States government's central counterterrorist watchlist known as the Terrorist Screening Database even though he was recorded in another, related database known as the Terrorist Identities Datamart Environment (TIDE) (Tipton et al., 2010).