Daubenton, Louis Jean Marie

Daubenton, Louis Jean Marie

(lwē zhäN märē` dōbäNtôN`), 1716–1800, French naturalist. He was a professor at the Collège de France from 1778; his work touched many fields—comparative anatomy, plant physiology, mineralogy, and experimental agriculture. He is known for his work on the anatomy of mammals in Buffon's Histoire naturelle and is credited with introducing the Merino sheep into France.
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Daubenton, Louis Jean Marie

 

Born May 29, 1716, at Montbard, Cote d’Or; died Jan. 1, 1800, in Paris. French naturalist and member of the French and St. Petersburg academies.

From 1749 to 1767, Daubenton collaborated with G. Buffon on the multivolume Natural History. The first 15 volumes of this work contain his comparative-anatomical descriptions of 182 species of mammals, of which more than 50 were studied for the first time; seven of the bat species described had been unknown up to that time. Daubenton’s method was to compare the same organs in different animals, as well as their skeletons. He also studied the acclimatization of domestic animals and developed a new breed of merino sheep. He was the author of a guide to sheep raising (1782). After Buffon’s death (1788) he was the director of the Botanical Garden of Paris.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.