Daughters of the American Revolution

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Daughters of the American Revolution

(DAR), a Colonial patriotic society in the United States, open to women having one or more ancestors who aided the cause of the Revolution. The society was organized (1890) at Washington, D.C., and has its national headquarters at Memorial Continental Hall there. The society has done much for the preservation and marking of historic places. In politics, the DAR has been criticized for its conservative policies. There is a similar but unrelated organization known as the Daughters of the Revolution.

Bibliography

See studies by M. Strayer (1958, repr. 1973) and P. Anderson (1974).

Daughters of the American Revolution

(D.A.R) conservative society of female descendants of Revolutionary War soldiers. [Am. Hist.: Jameson, 132]
References in periodicals archive ?
I am a daughter of the Revolution," she declares at the Garrison Centennial, "you do not acknowledge black daughters of the Revolution but we are going to take that right.
In print and on the platform, Brown reveals, Hopkins built on and enabled the work of many other black daughters of the Revolution, of the past and yet to come.
Although we make a valiant effort, we never make it to the second act of Daughters of the Revolution.
The atmosphere is rather tense as everyone readies him- or herself for the second and final dress rehearsal of Daughters of the Revolution.
Staged with sophisticated and exciting multimedia dimensions by Tony Taccone, artistic director of Berkeley Rep, the two plays, Daughters of the Revolution and Mothers Against, ran through mid-July in Ashland.
For example, the album opens with the rock 'n' roll mysticism of "Goodbye Daughters of the Revolution," a slash-and-burn call to arms for all those who have been waiting for this band's brand of loud soul to rise again.
The performances include Les Liaisons Dangereuses, comedy The Knocky, Marat/Sade, a play about the Marquis de Sade, and drama Daughters of the Revolution.
electoral process, while play two, Daughters of the Revolution, reads the system through a Democratic lens.
Mothers Against and Daughters of the Revolution are two separate but dovetailed plays revolving around an election for the office of state governor.
However, the central character in Daughters of the Revolution is not McKeene but Michael Bern, a 55-year-old community college professor.
Like Destiny, which related the then rise of far-right politics in the West Midlands to Britain's post-colonial history, Mothers Against and Daughters of the Revolution (jointly presented as Continental Divide) are plays about a political big picture, as seen through the dilemmas of individuals.
Performed under the umbrella title Conti-nental Divide, Mothers Against and Daughters of the Revolution were written in response to coincidental commissions from different American theatres, but were designed to give complementary views of a presidential election, reflecting on the direction taken by American politics since the radical days of the 1960s.

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