Davy lamp

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Related to Davy lamps: Miner's Safety Lamp

Davy lamp

[′dā·vē ‚lamp]
(mining engineering)
An early safety lamp with a mantle of wire gauze around the flame to dissipate the heat from the flame to below the ignition temperature of methane.
References in periodicals archive ?
A lantern parade was held in Heaton Park, Newcastle, last week in memory of the 34 boys who died alongside 41 men in the Heaton Main Pit disaster of 1815, where it's said the Davy lamp was used for the first time in the attempted rescue.
The Davy lamp had been newly invented by Sir Humphry; with the iron gauze screen enclosing the wick meaning meant it could be used safely down coal mines.
That same year, Sir Humphry carried out his investigations using methane gas collected from Hebburn Colliery, where the Davy lamp was successfully tested in January 1816.
the Davy lamp Corrie's Deirdre & Ken and the autographed bottle of bubbly
Loud: Pro-Tibet demonstrators show their anger; Thai touchdown: The flame arrives in Bangkok yesterday; Burning desire: Bosses Sandy Dow, left, and Kenny Pullar show off the old Davy lamp
And the whole room stays faithful to the house's seaside location with a nautical theme - framed pictures of three beach huts and Davy lamps that remind Rick of lighthouses - and cream and blue shades.
Davy lamps sit on a shelf in the front room, surrounded by row after row of books.