Daylighting


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daylighting

[′dā‚līd·iŋ]
(civil engineering)
To light an area with daylight.

Daylighting

Using natural light in an interior space to substitute for artificial light. Daylighting is considered a sustainable building strategy in that it can reduce reliance on artificial light and reduce energy use in the process, and when well designed, it contributes to occupant comfort and performance. Common daylighting strategies include the proper orientation and placement of windows, use of light wells, light shafts or tubes, skylights, clerestory windows, light shelves, reflective surfaces, and shading, and the use of interior glazing to allow light into adjacent spaces. South-facing windows are most advantageous for daylighting and for moderating seasonal temperatures. They allow the most winter sunlight into the home but little direct sun during the summer.

daylighting

Lighting of the interior of a building by natural means; for example, by windows or skylights.
References in periodicals archive ?
While overwhelming support shows that good daylighting design improves surroundings and occupant productivity, there are a few things you need to keep in mind.
We need to know what light exposure pattern would be healthful, together with when and why the shades are drawn, in order to begin to develop daylighting solutions that will enable people to receive that pattern.
While these improved technologies have significantly expanded daylighting applications, the complete displacement of all daytime electric lighting equipment has remained elusive.
The external obstruction influences the daylighting performance in two aspects; (1) the amount sky being obstructed or unobstructed, (2) the colour of the external surface finish which can be regarded as the reflected luminance from the obstructing buildings [5].
President Brett Hanley shares, "We change the world and connect people to nature on a daily basis by offering innovative, sustainable solutions for everyday living." This passion is changing the way people use daylighting through the introduction of the highest quality tubular daylighting devices on the market and educating the public worldwide on the benefits of daylighting their homes, offices, and warehouses.
From a daylighting perspective, this includes CRI levels, footcandle levels and glare; human factors including circadian rhythms, flicker and productivity; client sustainability goals, tax incentives and regulatory drivers; and total cost of ownership that incorporates energy savings, maintenance costs and disposal fees.
Many daylighting techniques are site-specific, so the amount of fenestration, window to wall ratios (by orientation), skylights or roof monitors, and fixed shading devices can all be adjusted to optimize the use of available daylight.
The design of proper daylighting in buildings is coupled mainly with a window design and its glass transmittance [McMullan 2007; Szokolay 2008; Baker & Steemers 2002; Evans 1981] in the response with external daylight conditions.
"Most people call it `potholing' but we prefer `daylighting'", says Tor Wilson, President and CEO of Badger Daylighting. "Daylighting is a more comprehensive term - it means exposing underground lines to daylight.
Daylighting reduces energy consumption, improves employee productivity and reduces absenteeism.
A simple horizontal surface called a light shelf can help natural light penetrate further into your building, saving you money on artificial lighting and providing occupants with the benefits of daylighting. Could a light shelf fit your facility?