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Normandy campaign

Normandy campaign, June to Aug., 1944, in World War II. The Allied invasion of the European continent through Normandy began about 12:15 A.M. on June 6, 1944 (D-day). The plan, known as Operation Overlord, had been prepared since 1943; supreme command over its execution was entrusted to Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower. In May, 1944, tactical bombing was begun in order to destroy German communications in N France. Just after midnight on June 6, British and American airborne forces landed behind the German coastal fortifications known as the Atlantic Wall. They were followed after daybreak by the seaborne troops of the U.S. 1st Army and British 2d Army. Field Marshal B. L. Montgomery was in command of the Allied land forces. Some 4,000 transports, 800 warships, and innumerable small craft, under Admiral Sir B. H. Ramsay, supported the invasion, and more than 11,000 aircraft, under Air Chief Marshal Sir Trafford Leigh-Mallory, formed a protective umbrella. While naval guns and Allied bombers assaulted the beach fortifications, the men swarmed ashore. At the base of the Cotentin peninsula the U.S. forces established two beachheads—Utah Beach, W of the Vire River, and Omaha Beach, E of the Vire, the scene of the fiercest fighting. British troops, who had landed near Bayeux on three beaches called Gold, Juno, and Sword, advanced quickly but were stopped before Caen. On June 12 the fusion of the Allied beachheads was complete. The German commander, Field Marshal Gerd von Rundstedt, found that Allied air strength prevented use of his reserves. U.S. forces under Gen. Omar N. Bradley cut off the Cotentin peninsula (June 18), and Cherbourg surrendered on June 27. The Americans then swung south. After difficult fighting in easily defendable “hedgerow” country they captured (July 18) the vital communications center of Saint-Lô, cutting off the German force under Field Marshal Erwin Rommel. The U.S. 3d Army under Gen. George S. Patton was thrown into the battle and broke through the German left flank at Avranches. Patton raced into Brittany and S to the Loire, swinging east to outflank Paris. A German attempt to cut the U.S. forces in two at Avranches was foiled (Aug. 7–11). The British had taken Caen on July 9, but they were again halted by a massive German tank concentration. They resumed their offensive in August and captured Falaise on Aug. 16. Between them and the U.S. forces driving north from Argentan the major part of the German 7th Army was caught in the “Falaise pocket” and was wiped out by Aug. 23, opening the way for the Allies to overrun N France.

Bibliography

See G. A. Harrison, Cross Channel Attack (1951); C. Ryan, The Longest Day (1959, repr. 1967); A. McKee, Last Round against Rommel (1964); A. A. Mitchie, The Invasion of Europe (1964); Army Times Ed., D-day, the Greatest Invasion (1969); S. E. Ambrose, D-day, June 6, 1944 (1994); R. J. Drez, Voices of D-day (1994); R. Miller, Nothing Less than Victory (1994); T. A. Wilson, D-day 1944 (1994); A. Beevor, D-day: The Battle for Normandy (2009).

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D-day

The unnamed day on which hostilities, an operation, or an exercise commences or will commence. All other days are then in reference to the D-day, as D + 2, D − 3, and so on. The related term for the time is the H-hour.
An Illustrated Dictionary of Aviation Copyright © 2005 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved

D-Day

June 6
The day is also known as Allied Landing Observances Day . It marks the start of the Allied invasion of occupied France in 1944, which led to the final defeat of Hitler's Germany the following May. The assault, led by U.S. Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower, was carried out by airborne forces and the greatest armada the world had ever known. About 3,000 ships transported 130,000 British, Canadian, and American troops across the English Channel to land on the beaches of Normandy, which are known historically by their invasion code names: Utah Beach, Omaha Beach, Gold Beach, Juno Beach, Sword Beach.
Airborne troops began parachuting into Normandy at 15 minutes past midnight on June 6, and Landing Craft Transports plowed through the surf to spill troops onto the beaches starting at 6:30 a.m. About 10,000 troops were killed or wounded that day. Each year, simple ceremonies at the Normandy cemeteries commemorate the men who fell.
CONTACTS:
Normandy Tourist Board
14, rue Charles Corbeau
Evreux, 27000 France
33-2-3233-7900; fax: 33-2-3231-1904
www.normandie-tourisme.fr/normandy-tourism-109-2.html
National World War II Museum
945 Magazine St.
New Orleans, LA 70130
504-527-6012; fax: 504-527-6088
www.ddaymuseum.org
SOURCES:
AmerBkDays-2000, p. 422
AnnivHol-2000, p. 97
DictDays-1988, p. 29
(c)
Holidays, Festivals, and Celebrations of the World Dictionary, Fourth Edition. © 2010 by Omnigraphics, Inc.

D-Day

Allied invasion of France during WWII (June 6, 1944). [Eur. Hist.: Fuller, III, 562–567]
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

D-day

the day, June 6, 1944, on which the Allied invasion of Europe began
www.dday.co.uk
www.ddaymuseum.org
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
DDay would also force the president to rethink his relationship to public opinion.
" A spokesman for the home said it was "d"nitely not the case" that the veteran was banned from attending the DDay commemorations.
YESTERDAY'S SOLUTIONS RUGS DDAY PEN ERNE RACE AYE ASAP EMULATED RATTAN TLC ERNIE MULL BESTMAN ERIE AVE SNACK GOA BEEP PRETEND ANDY STORE RAT FREEZE TAKEROOT OVER AGE CUBE F I BS BAN STIR FLUE WEE THINKER Across: 1 Rapt, 4 Sorts, 7 Couch, 8 Torch, 9 Ouija, 10 Illiterate, 14 Ensign, 16 Enough, 17 Gamekeeper, 22 Scamp, 23 Stand, 25 Lithe, 26 Rinse, 27 Drey.
This week they will travel to north west France where they will take part in the ceremonies commemorating DDay, which led to the liberation of Europe and marked the beginning of the end of the Second World War.
"She was only just beaten in the Oaks, she was spot-on for that race and I thought that would be her DDay as Sariska was going to improve a lot - and she has.
She calls her campaign DDay - Donate Don't Dump Day - out on the road, and enlists the help of Erin O'Connor and Peaches Geldof.
More than that, though, as a soldier with the King's Royal Rifle Corps at the DDay landings, he stepped on a mine and lost his right leg.
"They had stormed the beaches of Normandy on DDay. And our thoughts were of our dads, who had probably taken the same route to the horrible war of 1914 to 1918.
DDay on Ronaldinho's longrunning transfer sagaRONALDINHO'S brother Roberto Assis, who acts as his agent, predicts the longrunning saga over the Brazilian's transfer will reach its conclusion tomorrow.
OPERATION Echo is planning to send a party of Normandy veterans to France to be a part of next year's 60th anniversary of DDay. Along with the Royal British Legion and the Normandy Veterans' Association we believe our war heroes deserve the chance to return for what could be their last major anniversary of the landings.
"We wanted to do the bike ride in the summer and thought DDay would be ideal to round up the military theme."