De Morgan, Augustus

De Morgan, Augustus

(də môr`gən), 1806–71, English mathematician and logician, b. India. A noted teacher, he was professor of mathematics (1828–31, 1836–66) at University College (now part of the Univ. of London) and a founder and first president (1865) of the London Mathematical Society. Known as a reformer of logic, he developed a new logic of relations that he summarized in Syllabus of a Proposed System of Logic (1860). His works include An Essay on Probabilities (1838), Formal Logic (1847), Trigonometry and Double Algebra (1849), and A Budget of Paradoxes (1872).

De Morgan, Augustus

 

Born June 27, 1806, in Madurai, India; died Mar. 8, 1871, in London. Scottish mathematician and logician.

De Morgan was a professor of mathematics from 1828 to 1831 and from 1836 to 1866 at University College in London. He was the first president (1866) of the London Mathematical Society. His works on the theory of series are well known, as are his historicomathematical and historicophysical studies. De Morgan arrived at his ideas of the algebra of logic independently of G. Boole. De Morgan’s chief results were formulated in the work Formal Logic (1847; 2nd ed., 1946), in which he set forth the elements of the propositional calculus and the logic of classes and gave the first complete system of the algebra of relations.

WORKS

First Notions of Logic, Preparatory to Study of Geometry. London, 1839.
A Budget of Paradoxes. London, 1872. New edition [London], 1954.
Syllabus of a Proposed System of Logic. London, 1860.
References in periodicals archive ?
De Morgan, Augustus. An Essay on Probabilities and on their Application to Life Contingencies and Insurance Offices.