Christine de Pisan

(redirected from De Pisan)
Also found in: Dictionary.

Christine de Pisan:

see Pisan, Christine dePisan, Christine de
, 1364–c.1430, French poet, of Italian descent. She wrote many verse romances and works in prose, as well as the lyric poems for which she is most famous. Remarkable in character and learning, Christine sought to express the dignity of woman.
..... Click the link for more information.
.

Pisan, Christine de

(krēstēn` də pēzäN`), 1364–c.1430, French poet, of Italian descent. She wrote many verse romances and works in prose, as well as the lyric poems for which she is most famous. Remarkable in character and learning, Christine sought to express the dignity of woman. Her writings include Le Livre des fais d'armes et de chevalerie, first translated and printed by Caxton as The Book of Fayttes of Armes and of Chivalrye (1489; new ed. 1932) and Le Livre du duc des vrais amans (tr. The Book of the Duke of True Lovers, 1908).
The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/

Christine de Pisan

?1364--?1430, French poet and prose writer, born in Venice. Her works include ballads, rondeaux, lays, and a biography of Charles V of France
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
(26.) From Maurice Roy, Oeuvres poetiques de Christine de Pisan, 3 vols.
(2.) My references to Stephanie Jed, an Italianist, and Christine de Pisan were motivated in part by the occasion for the original paper, the Legacy-sponsored panel at the Transatlantic Women II conference in Florence, Italy, in June 2013.
Klanac used excerpts from medieval French poet Christine de Pisan, said to be Europe's first professional writer.
Once students have the opportunity to view A Knight's Tale and to read the associated background material on the late Middle Ages, we do a tutorial class in which they engage with an extract from Christine de Pisan's "The Book of the City of Ladies." (18) The questions attached to this primary source reading encourage students to consider an historical individual (Christine de Pisan) as illustrating broad characteristics of the late Middle Ages.
Western medieval literary versions include Boccaccio's The Decameron, Petrarch's Seniles, Le Mesnagier de Paris (, Le Livre Griseldis (Anonymous), Philippe de Mezieres's Miroir des dames mariees (Le Miroir des femmes), Geoffrey Chaucer's "The Clerk's Tale" in his Canterbury Tales, Christine de Pisan's Livre de la cite des dames.
Fourteenth century single mom Christine de Pisan wrote poetry and letters and was quite possibly the first European woman to support herself by writing.
For example, Gabrielle Suchon, Harriet Taylor, Mary Wollstonecraft, Blaise Pascal, Christine de Pisan and Simone de Beauvoir all (indirectly) broach the question of the unthought and allow hope for change in epistemology and social conditions.
But "This face--not her face" reminds the reader to be vigilant against particular attributions of identity, for example to de Pisan or Guest herself.
404).The feminist viewpoint is not forgotten and is given a well-balanced treatment, with analysis of Christine de Pisan, Helen Cixous, Nancy Miller, and A.
Philippe de Mezieres, Eustache Deschamps, Honore Bovet, and Christine de Pisan are the poets.