Christine de Pisan

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Christine de Pisan:

see Pisan, Christine dePisan, Christine de
, 1364–c.1430, French poet, of Italian descent. She wrote many verse romances and works in prose, as well as the lyric poems for which she is most famous. Remarkable in character and learning, Christine sought to express the dignity of woman.
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Pisan, Christine de

(krēstēn` də pēzäN`), 1364–c.1430, French poet, of Italian descent. She wrote many verse romances and works in prose, as well as the lyric poems for which she is most famous. Remarkable in character and learning, Christine sought to express the dignity of woman. Her writings include Le Livre des fais d'armes et de chevalerie, first translated and printed by Caxton as The Book of Fayttes of Armes and of Chivalrye (1489; new ed. 1932) and Le Livre du duc des vrais amans (tr. The Book of the Duke of True Lovers, 1908).
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Christine de Pisan

?1364--?1430, French poet and prose writer, born in Venice. Her works include ballads, rondeaux, lays, and a biography of Charles V of France
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
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Based on Gabriella Parussa's critical edition of the Epistre Othea (Droz, 1999), this English translation by two eminent scholars makes accessible Christine de Pizan's early, but very complex, work, written c.
Following her persuasive study The Life and Afterlife of Isabeau of Bavaria (Baltimore, 2010), which provided a rehabilitation of this much-maligned spouse of the French king Charles VI, Adams now tackles the political allegiance of Christine de Pizan in late medieval France, a country in the midst of a hundred year conflict with England and eventually tom apart by civil war.
(2) The significance of the Epistre for this debate is outlined in Poems of Cupid, God of Love: Christine de Pizan's "Epistre au dieu d'Amours" and "Dit de la Rose", Thomas Hoccleve's "The Letter of Cupid"; Editions and Translations, with George Sewell's "The Proclamation of Cupid", ed.
"'Perdre son latin': Christine de Pizan and Vernacular Humanism." In Christine de Pizan and the Categories of Difference, edited by Marilynn Desmond, 91-107.
Dionysius, the cavorting of dead and alive bodies in the Berlin hourbook of Mary of Burgundy, and the good death of Richard Whittingtom.) The essays also cover the notion of bodily rhetoric, as the function of the body in Eupolemius, inscriptions in flesh, masculinity and persuasion in medieval rhetoric, the performing body (as it figured in executions for treason to heal the treason, impotence and sexuality in theology and canon law, and body talk in medieval Islam.) Finally, contributors examine the medieval material body, describing the occurrence of leprous feminine flesh as it related to death and de Pizan's representation of death as metamorphosis.
Laura Rinaldi Dufresne, Professor of Art History at Winthrop University, Rock Hill, SC, is the author of The Fifteenth-Century Illustrations of Christine de Pizan's The Book of the City of Ladies and The Treasure of the City of Ladies (2012).
Especially over the last few decades, Christine de Pizan has served as a source of inspiration for medievalists and various researchers to such an extent that one might wonder if there is anything left to say about her.
On the textual level, feminists looking through history for "grand-mothers" have often visited the works and recorded histories of women like Christine de Pizan, but feminist critical inquiry has often been sparked by thinking about motherhood in a self-reflexive way while the feminist scholar /close reader is herself a mother.
Hult's book focuses on the person responsible for launching the debate of the Romance of the Rose, Christine de Pizan. Hult presents Christine and her participation in the debate soberly and justly, beginning with his introductory statement that she "Is far from being the first female author in the French literary tradition" (I).
For instance, in "Christine de Pizan's Life in Lament," Nadia Margolis traces the historical causes for the many different types of heart-rending lament that Christine de Pizan penned over her life, ending with a discussion of Pizan's Heures de Contemplacion.