Bernard of Cluny

(redirected from De contemptu mundi)

Bernard of Cluny

(klo͞o`nē) or

Bernard of Morlaix

(môrlā`), fl. 1150, French Cluniac monk, of English parentage. He wrote De contemptu mundi [on contempt for the world], a poem in 3,000 hexameters. On it Horatio Parker based his oratorio Hora novissima, and from it John Mason Neale drew the words of Jerusalem the Golden.
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Un ejemplo lo encontramos en literatura como el De Contemptu mundi o el Dies Irae, el surgimiento del Purgatorio, la conciencia del juicio particular.
47) Preterea ad Florentinam sororem suam de institucione uirginum et de contemptu mundi edidit libellum unum.
15-17 <<Praeterea edidit unum ad Florentinam sororem de institutione uirginum et contemptu mundi libellum, titulorum distinctionibus praenotatum>>: De institutione uirginum et de contemptu mundi (CPL 1183);
Ese abandono de lo material, de contemptu mundi, que Sancho ha logrado mediante su contemplacion del teatro del mundo esta estrechamente relacionado con el motivo central del cartografo y cosmografo flamenco, Abraham Ortelius en su Theatrum Orbis Terrarum (1570) dedicado a Felipe II, y mas concretamente su Typus Orbis Terrarum el mapa con el que se da inicio el atlas.
Erasmo de Rotterdam, en su opusculo De contemptu mundi, hace hablar a Alejandro Magno desde el sepulcro, diciendo:
9) La obra de Boccaccio, que habria servido de inspiracion para Chaucer es una obra de caracter historico-filosofico que reflexiona sobre el topico de contemptu mundi, la Caida de hombres ilustres (1373), escrita originalmente en latin.
This book legitimately focuses on the classical tradition, so Eden mentions only in passing specifically Christian texts such as De contemptu mundi, Enchiridion, Institutio principis christiani, and Paraclesis.
For example, in a number of letters she reveals feelings of depression, or what some might call the de contemptu mundi theme, as in the letters of 10 May 1623, 18 October 1630, and 2 July 1633.
For example, Kiening demonstrates cogently the impossibility of reliably reconstructing the Ackermann's archetype, refutes (to my mind conclusively) Antonin Hruby's notion of its possessing a common source with the Czech Tkadlecek, reveals the importance for its transmission of Diebolt Lauber's Alsatian scriptorium and of Albrecht Pfister's Bamberg press, and points to its appearance in several manuscripts with such apparently diverse texts as the German Belial, the Sieben weisen Meister, and Heinrich von Langenstein's De contemptu mundi.
Furthermore, the ~great men' approach to literary history has ensured that medieval scholarship on (for example) Virgil, Ovid, and the satirists has received a great deal of attention, whereas the glosses and commentaries on texts like the Disticha Catonis, the De contemptu mundi, and Alan of Lille's Parabolae have largely been ignored.
This can be demonstrated from a variety of his works, ranging from the deeply serious De contemptu mundi to the more lighthearted Praise of Folly and Lingua.
In his praise of monasticism, De contemptu mundi, composed in 1491 but not published until 1521, Erasmus sets out to persuade a "cousin" of his to abandon the stormy seas of this world by entering the monastery: "Ulysses, according to Homer a model of wisdom and perfection, barely made his escape from the Sirens' song despite taking great care to stop his ears with wax and have himself tied to the mast with a rope.