De profundis


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De profundis

De profundis (dā prōfo͞onˈdēs) [Lat.,=from the depths], the opening words of Psalm 130, one of the penitential Psalms, in Jerome's Latin version (see Vulgate); also used as a title for the Psalm.
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As a kind of spiritual or ethical (rather than an aesthetic) education, De Profundis can legitimately be regarded as a program of soul- rather than self-making.
Many readers disparage or dismiss De Profundis. It has been condemned as a "venomous dossier" and "obsessive piece of writing" (Julian 352), and it has been dismissed as the complaint of a very unhappy prisoner who "thereafter lost interest in" the work (Croft-Cooke 231).
Just, Not Fair and De Profundis continue until Saturday January 30.
If only his marvellous linguistic resourcefulness had not been quite so brilliantly effortless, and if only his way with consistency had not been so insultingly debonair; if only, perhaps, the language of De Profundis had not come too late.
1, with tritonal bass motions in bars 15-16 and 18-20), to the austere dissonance of his prophetic late style (see the beginning of the 'De profundis' in Ex.
The scorings for the three Litanies and De profundis settings are the same: eight soloists (of which five or six were essential), four-part chorus and continuo.
(The much neglected meditation on the figure of Jesus in De Profundis presents him as the archetypal cosmopolitan, one who first conceived the divided races as a unity" [De Profundis, 166].) Much of Wilde's writing testifies that he was as biblical in his orientation as he was classical or Hellenist.
Parts of Thomas De Quincey's Suspiria de Profundis were published by Blackwood's Magazine in 1845, and parts by De Quincey's final publisher, James Hogg junior, in 1853, but no coherent text survives either in print or in manuscript.
In any case, in the rest of the book there isn't much to support this claim for the importance of the `collapse' of intellectual consensus to Wilde's work, and instead we are presented with a straightforward account of the importance of the figure of Christ to Wilde's writing, finally emphasizing Wilde's penitence in De Profundis and his sense of the necessity of community (no less) in `The Ballad of Reading Gaol'.
De Profundis ("Out of the Depths") Letter written from prison by OSCAR WILDE.
Suppressed part of De Profundis published in Holland