Dead load

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Related to Dead loads: Live loads

dead load

[′ded ‚lōd]
(mechanics)

Dead load

The weight of all permanent and stationary construction materials or equipment in a building. See also live load.

dead load

1. The weight of a structure itself, including the weight of fixtures or equipment permanently attached to it. Compare with live load.
2. The load imposed on a pipe located in a trench and covered by infill; depends on the depth and width of the trench, and the density and character of the infill material.
References in periodicals archive ?
The moment diagram included the impact of self-weight (DL), superimposed dead load (SDL), live load (LL), top prestressing tendons (TP) and bottom prestressing tendons (BTP).
Seaders observed that the increase in load-carrying capacity was related to the magnitude of the dead load resisting moment.
In the equations, RF is the rating factor, C is the structural capacity, Rn is the nominal member resistance (as inspected), DC is the dead-load effect of structural components and attachments, DW is the dead-load effect of wearing surfaces and utilities, P is the permanent loading other than dead loads, LL is the live-load effect, IM is the dynamic load allowance, [[gamma].
The live and dead loads that are expected to act on the pole and its foundation,
Similarly, results from the normal, high and low dead loads show correlation.
Continue on down through the house, adding in the five and dead loads for each floor as you go.
The elastic-plastic bar structures of known topology subjected to varying repeated and dead loads are considered.
Fastener spacings given in Table 3 were derived by assuming deck live and dead loads of 40 and 10 psf, respectively.
In ASD, structural elements such as structural foundations, bridge beams and girders, or earth-retaining walls are designed to support, or resist, anticipated service loads, including vehicular live loads, superstructure dead loads, or lateral soil loads.
Accumulated dead loads from second-floor and roof construction and from furnishings can only increase that capacity.
In lieu of utilizing hydraulic actuators or dead loads, we employed a more novel approach using atmospheric pressure to apply the load.
Dead loads: Dead loads are the gravity loads due to the self weight of all permanent structural and non-structural components of a building, such as partition walls, floors and finishes, which are calculated from known specific weights of the materials used.