Deadweight


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Deadweight

 

the gross weight of a ship’s cargo.

The deadweight, in causing a ship to settle to its summer load line in seawater, is an indicator of a freighter’s dimensions and its basic operational characteristic. Quantitatively, the deadweight is equal to the difference between the water displacement and the ship’s own weight, including its machinery and equipment ready for operation (along with pipelines filled with fuel, water in the boilers cooling the pipelines, etc.). The principal part of the deadweight of a freighter is the weight of the cargo; on a passenger ship the weight of the cargo (passengers and baggage) amounts to the lesser part of the deadweight, whereas its greater part is made up by the supplies expended by the ship (fuel and water).

References in periodicals archive ?
The Deadweight Loss of Diwali," MPRA Working Paper, 2006.
Second, within the crop-producing sector, a necessary condition for large deadweight losses is for farmers to significantly alter the mix of crops as a result of the incentives provided by the programs.
But it is very probable that these projects are projects with the highest deadweight effect [35].
A field deadweight tester must be perfectly level in order to deliver an accurate reading.
Now that we have determined the maximum possible tax revenue for the case of the rectangularly distributed demand functions, we proceed to determine the associated deadweight social loss.
In such a world, the deadweight losses associated with copyright no longer apply.
He could have asked: Can tax rules reasonably be designed to reduce the deadweight loss from tax planning?
Part I provides a brief overview of basic economics and the concept of deadweight loss.
These machines were constructed about the year 1965, becoming operational following the completion of the deadweight mass determinations in 1966.
Aframax: a petroleum tanker with capacity of between 75,000 and 120,000 deadweight tonnage
These tankers will be phased out according to the following timetable:* category 1 vessels (oil tankers of 20,000 tonnes deadweight and above carrying crude as cargo, and of 30,000 tonnes deadweight and above carrying petroleum products which do not comply with the requirements for protectively located segregated ballast tanks): phase-out in 2005 or in 2007 at the latest if they pass a tighter inspection scheme (CAS- Condition Assessment Scheme);* category 2 vessels (the same as category one but they do comply with the protectively located segregated ballast tank requirements): phase-out in 2010 or 2015 at the latest under the CAS;* category 3 vessels (single-hull tankers of 5,000 tonnes deadweight and above but less than the tonnage specified for Category 1 and 2): phase-out in 2015.
It is 950 feet long and has a displacement of 58,000 deadweight tons.