death instinct

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death instinct

[′deth ‚in‚stinkt]
(psychology)
In psychoanalytic theory, the unconscious drive which leads the individual toward dissolution and death, and which coexists with the life instinct.
References in periodicals archive ?
For the first time he introduces the concept of death drive and creates a blurred opposition between life and death drive.
Borges's use of the Freudian death drive appeared in an essay that, according to Stavans, "has been insufficiently read, much less studied in detail" (5): "A Comment on August 23, 1944.
Marnie is a lone queer figure, living a life marked by the impulses of the death drive and a deep alienation from the expected narratives of motherhood and marriage.
By explaining that "[f]or Lacan, language and desire are both positioned around loss; representation and the death drive are irrevocably connected", DeRosa relates representation to the fantasy of imaginary and the death drive to the realm of the real,
Death Drive is about remarkable people, remarkable cars and remarkable circumstances and the car's role in creating some of the great celebrity myths.
In place of the child, Edelman affirms the chaotic jouissance of the death drive.
The theatrical emerges out of the force of the death drive in a collision between the live and the always undead cinematic.
Manifesting itself in wartime experience and in writing about that experience, he contends, the death drive provided authors with the ultimate challenge because, "resistant to representation and communication, [it] reveal[ed] itself only indirectly, through silence, disruption, or figuration" (172).
In No Future: Queer Theory and the Death Drive, Edelman describes queerness as a quality assigned to ideas or people who do not perpetuate the concept of futurity.
Graham Wolfe takes on more sombre subject matter in "Normand Chaurette's Fragments d'une lettre d'adieu lus par des geologues and the Zizekian Death Drive," offering a fresh and sophisticated reading of Chaurette's 1986 play about the death of a geologist in Cambodia through an engagement with Slavoj Zizek's conception of the "death drive.
Derrida states that everyone craves nostalgia and the meaning and explanation from where things have come in relation to Freud's death drive.
Such an embrace would put Davies more in conversation with recent queer theory, since there are critical omissions here like Lee Edelman's No Future: Queer Theory and the Death Drive, which tackles the same angst about queer subjects and their non-reproductive culture that Merrill seems to experience in The Changing Light at Sandover.