Debye equation

Debye equation

[də′bī i′kwā·zhən]
(solid-state physics)
The equation for the Debye specific heat, which satisfies the Dulong and Petit law at high temperatures and the Debye T 3 law at low temperatures.
References in periodicals archive ?
Particularly, the value of [delta]E, as obtained from the Debye equation corresponding to a single relaxation, is smaller than the magnitude of the relaxation of E' that can be inferred from E' results in the limited test frequency range.
Caption: Figure 9: From DMA tests on AA 7075-T6 at 350, 365, and 375[degrees]C: isothermal loss modulus E" versus logarithm of the frequency f and Debye peaks as given by Debye equation (a); and storage modulus E' versus logarithm of the frequency f as given by Debye equation (b).
In this case, for a solid showing a single relaxation process, the real and imaginary parts of the compliance, [J.sub.1] and [J.sub.2], are given by the Debye equations [1]:
Debye equation presented in (1) is used to calculate the electrical properties of skin, fat, and muscle layers in the entire UWB frequency range with step size of 100 MHz.
The above equation corresponds to the Debye equation for n = 0, m = 1, [[omega].sub.p] = [[tau].sup.-1].
Molecular weight is then calculated directly from these recorded data, provided that the concentration of the solution is known, using the Zimm Rayleigh Debye equation.
Relationship between V and E is describable by Debye equation as
A generalization of the Clausius-Mossotti equation to include a permanent moment [[[vector].[micro]].sub.e] is summarized in what is called the Debye equation that is valid for gases and dilute solutions:
The Debye equation could be used to estimate the permittivity of a gas if both the polarizability and the dipole moment were known from experiment.
Onsager included the effects of the reaction field into the local field and obtained the following relationship for the static field that, and unlike the Debye equation, can be used to model the dipole moment of some pure liquids:
In some studies, least squares fitting technique has been applied to reduce Gabriel's 4-pole Cole-Cole equations to simpler 2-pole Debye equations [13-15].
A numerical technique is developed to accurately fit one, two, and three-term Debye equations with the published experimental data of biological tissues.