Decameron, The

Decameron, The

tales told by young people taking refuge from the black death ravaging Florence. [Ital. Lit.: Magill II, 231]
See: Disease

Decameron, The

Boccaccio’s bawdy panorama of medieval Italian life. [Ital. Lit.: Bishop, 314–315, 380]
References in periodicals archive ?
Another quality of this research is that, even if some of the novels examined by Migiel are not some of the most famous you can find in the Decameron, the author quickly explains them and therefore it is easier to follow the reading of every chapter.
In the Decameron, the term is mentioned first by Neifile, but with regard to the clerical catechism: Giannotto "engaged the most worthy men to instruct [ammaestrare] [Abraam] thoroughly in our faith" (I.
The first chapter begins, a rebours, with an examination of the last novella of the Decameron, the tale of Griselda.
4) Like the liera brigata in the Decameron, the young men and women in the Filocolo decide to pass the hottest hours of the day in a cool, shady garden, telling each other stories.
The novella is an enlarged anecdote like those found in Boccaccio's Decameron, the 14th-century Italian classic.
Let us begin by listing all these diverse components of the Decameron, keeping in mind that each of them leads to the following one in the structure of the work until we reach the core of the Decameron, the one hundred tales; at that point, each component travels again backwards, as it were, across the previous trajectory, returning to the point of departure, when the brigata returns to Florence, which is still devastated by the plague.
I am thinking of Bruno and Buffalmacco in the Decameron, the tricks by Ponzio mentioned in the Cortegiano (2.
Readers recall the danger of facing a crowd when, in the first tale of the Decameron, the two Florentine brothers feared for their life because of the wickedness of Ciappelletto, their guest, who unexpectedly fell ill and asked for a confessor.
Centered on the Decameron, the book reaches forward to twentieth-century narrative (e.
However we divide the Decameron, the Sixth Day is certainly placed in, at or around its center.
Finally, the humblest of all the women in the Decameron, the shepherdess Griselda, can transform herself into the noblest of all the women ever described in the Decameron; she can undergo and suffer the most undeserved and harshest trials and tribulations to which a human being and a mother can possibly be subjected while showing that humility, meekness, and submissiveness can conquer injustice, violence, and wickedness.
4) As readers move from Boccaccio's earlier works to the Decameron, the question about Fiammetta cannot be whether she is the continuation of the previous homonymous characters, for she is not and cannot be.