decay product


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Wikipedia.

decay product

[di′kā ‚prä·dəkt]
(nuclear physics)
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The exhaled air is passed to a delay chamber where the positively charged decay products of thoron (e.g.
While the uranium and radium in fluorosilicic acid are known carcinogens, two decay products of uranium are even more carcinogenic: radon-222 and polonium-210.
In contrast to low solubility of [sup.238]U-series actinides in produced fluids, [sup.238]U decay product radionuclide [sup.226]Ra ([t.sub.1/2] = 1,600 years) is highly soluble in such fluids.
A naturally occurring decay product of uranium, radium can break down into radon gas, a highly carcinogenic, colorless, odorless gas.
To do so, they measured nickel-60, a decay product of iron-60, in eight meteorites known to have formed at different times during the first 3 million years of the solar system.
Magnesium makes a particularly good marker for planetary origins because, first, isotopes of magnesium can be separated during evaporation and condensation in the solar system and, second and more uniquely, one isotope of magnesium, Mg26, is a decay product of Al26, which existed in the early solar system for less than 5 million years.
Worse, a reanalysis of the original data showed no evidence of either element 118 or its decay product, element 116.
Although the aluminum-26 present in the early solar system has by now disappeared, researchers can infer its presence by measuring its decay product, magnesium-26.