Deccan basalt

Deccan basalt

[′dek·ən bə′sȯlt]
(geology)
Fine-grained, nonporphyritic, tholeiitic basaltic lava consisting essentially of labradorite, clinopyroxene, and iron ore; found in the Deccan region of southeastern India. Also known as Deccan trap.
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Superb Minerals, India had their usual large selection of zeolites and related minerals from the Deccan basalt of India.
Bhattacharyya T, Pal DK, Deshpande SB (1993) Genesis and transformation of minerals in the formation of red (Alfisols) and black (Inceptisols and Vertisols) soils on Deccan basalt in the Western Ghats, India.
Clay minerals of black soils developed on Deccan basalts (Pedons 3, 7, and 8) were composed primarily of smectite ([is greater than] 50%), with small amounts of kaolin, chlorite, vermiculite, mica, and quartz (Fig.
According to him the massive blocks are common striking features in thin basaltic layers particularly in the margin areas of the Deccan basalts and decomposition of the trap rocks under certain circumstances gives rise to eminently clayey products containing large percentage of iron.
The REE studies initiated by Alexander and Gibson (1977) for the Deccan basalts of Dhandhuka area, Western India have shown the significant concentrations of Cerium.
The eruptives from MgO-rich (~16%) parental picritic magma (Krishnamurthy and Cox, 1977) would yield higher platinum group element (PGE) concentrations than typical Deccan basalts and their Cr/Ni ratios are closer to those in the Spanish Caravaca K-T layer than to chondritic ratios (Vannucci et al.
Unlike the bulk of the Deccan basalts, these rocks north of the main lava flows did not erupt at the surface, but cooled underground and trapped the helium instead of releasing it into the atmosphere.