decimal

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decimal

1. a fraction that has a denominator of a power of ten, the power depending on or deciding the decimal place. It is indicated by a decimal point to the left of the numerator, the denominator being omitted. Zeros are inserted between the point and the numerator, if necessary, to obtain the correct decimal place
2. any number used in the decimal system
3. 
a. relating to or using powers of ten
b. of the base ten
4. expressed as a decimal
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Decimal

 

a fraction whose denominator is a whole power of the number 10. The decimal is written without a denominator, setting off in the numerator to the right of the decimal point as many digits as there are zeros in the denominator (for example, 485,634/1,000 = 485.634 and 3/100 = 0.03). In such notation, the part to the left of the decimal point designates the integer part of the fraction. The first digit after the decimal point designates the number of tenths; the second, the number of hundredths; and so forth.

The decimal notation of rational numbers whose denominator does not have other prime factors except 2 and 5 contains a finite number of digits (for example, 4/25 = 0.16). In general, the digits in the decimal notation of a rational number begin repeating at some position; such a number is an infinite repeating decimal (for example, 7/6 = 1.1666 …). Irrational numbers are nonrepeating infinite decimals (for example, Decimal = 1.41421 . … In all cases, the decimal of akak-1a0b1b2 … can be written in the form

where ak, ak-1, … , a0, b1b2, are the numerals 0, 1, 2, … , 9 (ak ≠ 0) in the corresponding digit of the number. For example, 382.1274 = 3 x 102 + 8 × 10 + 2 + 1/10 + 2/102 + 7/103 + 4/104, that is, here a2 = 3, a1 = 8,a0 = 2, b1 = 1, b2 = 2, b3 = 7, and b4 = 4. Decimals were already used in the 14th-15th centuries. The Samarkand mathematician Al Kashi described the decimal system in 1427. In Europe, the decimal was introduced by S. Stevin in 1584.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

decimal

[′des·məl]
(mathematics)
A number expressed in the scale of tens.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

decimal

Meaning 10. The numbering system used by humans, which is based on 10 digits. In contrast, computers use binary numbers because it is easier to design electronic systems that can maintain two states rather than 10.
Copyright © 1981-2019 by The Computer Language Company Inc. All Rights reserved. THIS DEFINITION IS FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY. All other reproduction is strictly prohibited without permission from the publisher.
References in periodicals archive ?
In equation 3, I have extended the previous regression equation by allowing the price impact of a trade, both before and after decimalization, to differ depending on whether the trade is large.
The first three columns of panel A in table 3 report statistics for regular trades prior to decimalization. These results are qualitatively similar to those reported in the first three columns in table 2.
Panel B in table 3 summarizes the regression results related to the period following decimalization. Average price impacts of regular trades fell following decimalization for virtually all stocks trading at least once each minute.
The final three columns of panel B report my findings regarding the liquidity of large trades after decimalization relative to before.
Whereas the largest 10 percent of trades of the most frequently traded stocks moved price by 3.0 basis points, trades greater than posted depth moved the price of these same stocks by 3.9 basis points before decimalization.
With this new definition of large trades, decimalization is still generally correlated with increased liquidity (lower price impact) of actively traded stocks.
This article has examined the impact of decimalization on the liquidity of NYSE stocks.
Because these findings suggest that decimalization had an ambiguous impact on market liquidity using spreads and depth as proxies for liquidity, I then estimated a different measure of liquidity that would be affected by changes in both spreads and depth.
Estimating price impact regressions, I find that actively traded stocks generally experienced an increase in liquidity (decrease in price impact) following decimalization. For less frequently traded stocks, the results were mixed.
Even though these large trades have higher price impacts than other trades, I still find that decimalization generally improved the liquidity of large trades for actively traded stocks.
The findings in this study suggest that decimalization on the NYSE was a positive step because policymakers prefer more liquid markets.
In the two years since decimalization, spreads and depth have continued to fall.