Deciphering


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical.

Deciphering

 

reading a text written in conventional signs, cipher, or code; also, analysis of various previously indecipherable systems of ancient writing; also, examination and interpretation of objects on the terrain in terrestrial, aerial, and space photography.

References in periodicals archive ?
Adkins explores his relationships with Irish scholar Edward Hincks, Austen Henry Layard, who excavated Nineveh, and their roles in deciphering cuneiform.
Then the deciphering and translations began in earnest, and newspapers trumpeted the breakthrough.
Therefore, Barbour concludes that Greene's "deciphering" - which refers to the representational act of a narrator - commits him to a priori truth and narrative stability.
One of the greatest archaeological challenges is deciphering the texts left behind by ancient civilizations.
"You can think of it as the READER'S DIGEST version of The Book of Man," says Sydney Brenner of the Salk Institute for Biological Studies in La Jolla, Calif., who more than a decade ago argued for deciphering, or sequencing, a puffer fish's genome.
In the March 5 CELL, in a study that extends Reed's findings, Buck and her colleagues describe a more natural approach to deciphering olfactory codes.
Deciphering the message involves going through the same procedure in reverse, using the same key (SN: 2/1/97, p.
Calling the findings "intriguing but by no means certain," Livio says they provide a new step in deciphering the physics of black holes and jet production.
Deciphering the information means going through the same operations in reverse order, using the same key.
On the other hand, if the sky is littered with such point-like sources, it will make the task of deciphering the structure of the microwave background at small angular scales far more difficult.
Some researchers who have examined the La Mojarra stone, such as archaeologist Sylvia Meluzin of California State University, Fullerton, argue that too little knowledge exists about Mayan writing and the nature of epi-Olmec signs to justify the amount of deciphering claimed by Justeson and Kaufman.
Venter says such bits of genes -- called expressed sequence tags--could serve as dots outlining the genome, providing researchers with starting points for locating and deciphering the code for all of the estimated 50,000 to 100,000 human genes.