Declaration of Indulgence


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Wikipedia.

Declaration of Indulgence

(1672) Charles II’s attempt to suspend discrimination against Nonconformists and Catholics. [Br. Hist.: Payton, 186]
See: Freedom
References in periodicals archive ?
Until James II issued his Declaration of Indulgence in 1687, the Nonconformists, or Dissenters, were punished for holding illegal meetings for worship.
Miss Hit finished ninth at Southwell on April 4 behind Ellens Academy in the Declaration of Indulgence Handicap, Spencer having failed to take 'reasonable and permissible measures throughout the race to ensure that the mare was given a full opportunity of obtaining the best possible placing'.
TRAINER Gerard Butler was fined pounds 1,000 and jockey Jamie Spencer banned for seven days after the Southwell stewards found them guilty of not allowing Miss Hit to run on her merits when ninth to Ellens Academy in the Declaration of Indulgence Handicap.
1687 - James issues a Declaration of Indulgence for greater religious tolerance
His release from prison came in March 1672 under Charles II's Declaration of Indulgence to the Nonconformists.
Such was the case in April of 1678, when James II issued his Declaration of Indulgence,(22) granting freedom of worship to Roman Catholics and all Protestants dissenting from the Anglican Church, thereby circumventing the provisions of the Test Acts of 1673 and 1678 as well as various Elizabethan statutes against dissenters (nonconformists) and Catholic (or 'Popish') recusants.

Full browser ?